Yes, I Bought a Puppy — And No, I Don’t Feel Bad About It

What bothers me is the social stigma surrounding buying a purebred dog. Is it fair to make someone feel guilty because they didn’t adopt from a shelter?

Editor’s Note: Petful is a vocal supporter of adoption/rescue over purchasing pets. With that said, we also believe in allowing a range of opinions on our site. The writer of the essay below may not be a cheerleader for shelter adoptions, but she clearly advocates careful research and breeder scrutiny when it comes to purchasing pets.

I bought a puppy and don't feel bad. By: John of Austin
Being a responsible caretaker is so much more important than whether or not you adopted that pet from a shelter. By: John of Austin

Over 30 years ago I met a giant dog who terrified me. He was my aunt’s dog and wasn’t mean; he was just a huge dog.

I was so afraid of this dog that whenever we visited my aunt, I wouldn’t go inside her house until the dog was put in another room.

It wasn’t long until I came to realize there was no reason to fear this dog, because he was the sweetest, gentlest dog I had ever met, and he gave the best kisses.

From then on, I swore that one day I would have a dog just like that.

Cash Exchanges Hands

Thirty years later I got that dog I had dreamed of for so many years. Actually, I bought that dog.

It wasn’t a spontaneous purchase. I didn’t all of a sudden one day decide that I wanted a dog and went out and bought the first one that I saw. It took years for me to buy this dog.

I researched the breed. I researched the breeders. I knew what I wanted, and I knew what to expect. And then I waited for the perfect time to purchase him. This dog was going to become a member of my family — a companion for me, a companion for my husband and a companion for my children. Things needed to be just right for us to bring this new member of the family home.

Don’t Miss: The Importance of Getting to Know Your Dog’s Breeder

The kids had to be a reasonable age, the finances to care for a dog had to be there and the time needed to care for a dog had to be available.

Finally, the planets aligned, and the perfect time came. I put down a cash deposit before he was born, and 9 weeks later he graced this world with his adorable, plump brown self. I drove more than 6 hours to get him and handed over a lump sum of cash to the breeder.

No Buyer’s Remorse

I have never regretted that day or the amount of money I spent. Never — ever.

In fact, 4 years after I bought him, I bought another one. And in 10 years I will probably buy another one and another one and another one. I won’t ever feel bad about it, and what bothers me is that some people try to make me feel bad for buying a dog.

Why is there a stigma attached to buying a purebred dog?

I’ve been alienated at events for not adopting from a shelter instead. I’ve been told by a person that they would never touch my breeder-bought dog, not even with a 10-foot pole. I’ve been told numerous times that for every dog I bought, a shelter dog died. Good grief, people.

People Like Me Aren’t the Problem

I am fully aware that there are millions of dogs in shelters that need homes, and that sucks. I’m not against adopting — I’m all for it. It’s just not my choice.

I am also fully aware that people like me are not the ones who are responsible for those dogs being in shelters, and people like me are not the ones who are adding to the number of growing dogs in shelters today. I’m one of the responsible pet caretakers who bought a dog from a responsible breeder and put a lot of careful research into it.

Don’t Miss: Puppy Mill Red Flags — Don’t Be an Accidental Supporter

I’m not the one who bought a dog from a backyard breeder or a pet shop and then decided to drop it off at the pound because it had too many health problems.

I’m not the person who picked up and moved and left my dog behind.

I’m not the one who kept my dog for 12 years and then decided it was too old and took it to the pound.

And dare I say it, I’m not the person who adopted a dog from a shelter that I knew nothing about, then it turned out s/he was just too much to handle — so I’m exchanging this dog for the other dog in the shelter that I know nothing about, and wouldn’t you know, that dog poops too much, so I’m going to just leave it outside for the rest of its life.

I am not that person.

I did purchase a puppy. I’ll do it again, and I won’t feel any remorse for it. And one day maybe I will adopt a dog from a shelter, but not because someone told me I had to — rather, because it will be my own choice.

Jennifer Costello

View posts by Jennifer Costello
Jennifer Costello is a pet blogger and veterinary technician. She shares all about her life with her family and dogs, Sherman and Leroy on her blog, My Brown Newfies. When not on adventures with the dogs, Jen is spending time with her husband, two children and guinea pig. Jen’s passions include photography, pet health and all things dog.

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212 Comments

  1. Carol Hawley Baker
    March 6, 2014

    I am all for people buying from responsible breeders if that is what they so desire. Good for you, Jennifer, for doing your research and being a responsible pet owner, whether purchased or adopted from a shelter. I, myself, could never buy a dog from a breeder. I just can’t justify the cost. I have 7 dogs of my own, 4 were adopted through local shelters and 3 were rescued off the street before they ever made it to a shelter. I volunteer at a local shelter and see the dogs that come in, the puppies leftover from irresponsible breeders, the purebred dogs who wound up being too much for a family, or couldn’t move with them, or whatever other nonsense reason the owner gives. I’ve seen the conditions some of these dogs come in with. I’ve fostered dozens of puppies and dogs while they awaited rescue. Jennifer is right. It’s not the responsible buyers and breeders who fill the shelters with unwanted pets. It’s the irresponsible owners and breeders, the puppy mills, the pet shops, who fill the shelters. Responsible breeders don’t dump their “leftovers” at a shelter. They don’t try to “get rid of” them some other inhumane way. They don’t overbreed, which can cause health problems. And the people who do their research and buy from these responsible breeders don’t pay such a high price just to dump their new family member at the first sign of a problem or when it’s too old to play or look cute anymore. Adopting an animal has many faces, whether adopted from a shelter or adopted and bought from a (responsible) breeder. Guilting someone who bought a dog is not the way to make shelter overcrowding disappear. Spaying or neutering your pets is a great way to start.

    Reply
  2. Flea
    March 6, 2014

    We purchased our first full bred puppy when we were newlyweds. That dog set the precedent for us and the breed we love. It also taught me that I don’t really want to housebreak another puppy ever again. I’m not a big-hearted advocate of anything, really. I just know what I like and want. And what I don’t. We adopt because I’m lazy and don’t want to housebreak a puppy. Housebreaking the children was enough. That said, we adopted another dog last weekend, a six month old puppy who is a full breed. And housebroken. Win/win.

    Reply
    1. Jen K
      March 6, 2014

      Haha! I completely relate! Our plan to adopt an adult dog (which resulted in Alma) was definitely in part due to our desire to not take on ‘puppy issues’ at that time, if we could avoid it!

      Reply
      1. Sherry
        March 13, 2014

        I’ve heard quite a few people say, “Buying a pet from a breeder is taking away a home from a shelter pet”. I don’t agree. My husband was given a Maine Coon kitten by a responsible breeder, a very pretty kitten we named Marilyn Maine-roe, in exchange for doing drywall work on her cattery. Did Marilyn cause a shelter cat to lose the chance of getting a home? No because we weren’t getting another cat otherwise.

        Reply
  3. Lara
    March 6, 2014

    I don’t begrudge anyone this choice if it’s one made when backed up by knowledge and research as you have done. I’m a huge advocate for adoption and have had nothing but rescue animals; however, 2 out of 3 of my rescued dogs have been reactive, challenging, and not for the first-time dog owner. I’ve no doubt they would have been returned by the fainter of heart. I think we should be supporting responsible breeders and working within our communities to reduce the number of pets in shelters through spay/neuter programs and intervention as well as bringing down commercial puppy wholesalers and pet stores that sell puppies and kittens. Thanks for braving this topic!

    Reply
    1. sedna101
      March 14, 2014

      Anyone paying attention knows that it is the backyard greeders and puppy mills who start this problem. I would love to come up with some way to have a law that any animal sold as a pet has to be microchipped with the breeders info; so when they end up in the pound, the breeder can pay for the care of that animal until it is adopted, instead of the taxpayers. Responsible breeders would want to know that their progeny was there and would take care of the situation. The others should pay the cost of their business.

      Reply
  4. nailahbone
    March 6, 2014

    Thank you for pointing out that people that blindly adopt pets can be just as problematic as those that blindly buy a dog from a pet store. During my short time volunteering at my local shelter I have seen this “impulse adoption” and it makes me fear they’ll either return the animal or worse mistreat it. I would never in my wildest dream just drive up to a pet shop or shelter and just willy nilly pick out a dog. I researched my dogs breed for 5 months before then researching breeders for 3 months before I was ready to buy her. I mulled over how having my dog would affect me for the next 12-15 (hopefully longer!) years of my life before putting down a deposit on her. I am now considering getting another dog, from another breeder, but that won’t be for another couple years. Even though this is the case I am still casually checking out breeders and thinking on how I’ll provide for her.

    Reply
  5. Jen K
    March 6, 2014

    Couldn’t help but raise my eyebrow at that Editor’s Note… Sure, the site promotes adoption, but so does the post author! She even explicitly says so.
    … I get so exhausted by false dichotomies and in-fighting in the pet community.

    I will temper and add context to my comment by noting I have 2 purebred Newfouldands: one from a breeder and one from a rescue. I have certainly been the recipient of distain when telling others Moses is from a breeder (not a good approach to influencing others, I might add), but I have also experienced shock when telling others Alma is from a rescue (yes, purebred dogs also wind up in the rescue system).

    While the original source of an animal might be a decent hint, it is the intent of the buyer that is always the determination of whether or not getting the pet was an ethical choice. If you are knowledgeable, prepared, and make the commitment, there is nothing unethical about getting a puppy from a responsible breeder. Nothing.

    Because, as the post demonstrates incredibly well, these responsible breeders – and those who source from them – are not the cause of pet overpopulation. Puppy mills and backyard breeders (oopsie litters from unresponsible people who didn’t spay/neuter, for example) are.

    And an adoption from a shelter is not the indication of a perfectly ethical decision. They can still be impulsive. And they can still be re-surrendered. Sure, rescues do their best to mitigate these risks, but they can’t eliminate them.

    The intent and commitment of the adopter/buyer is always the determining factor in whether or not the pet was sourced ethically.

    Reply
  6. rnkelli
    March 6, 2014

    Next time Jen, calmly ask those same critics if they birthed their own children, or if they adopted them from one of the many MANY shelters/orphanages around the world. I can’t believe people have been so rude to you.

    Reply
    1. imasweetp2
      March 15, 2014

      I get your point, and I am sure we agree. Also, I plan to get my first ever puppy from a breeder who I have researched. I would like to add, though, that I have a son who I adopted. For those of us who adopted, that type of comment is hurtful. I can’t imagine my life without my son, and the fact that I never gave birth is inconsequential. People made comments about my son, too like , “couldn’t you have your own children?” to name just one. He is my own. Because of that, I and other adoptive moms are sensitive. I apologize for being touchy, but it goes back to the comments I have received over the years. That being said, we agree, I’m sure, that it is no one’s business why we rescue/ adopt or not when it comes to our PETS. I have had 4 cats over the years that were rescued, but I have always wanted a particular type of dog – for over 30 years. I’m finally in the right situation to make that happen and I have taken the first steps to get my puppy. Each pet should be a lifetime commitment, and whether you can only care for one or ten, every pet deserves a good and loving home and it should be a serious decision.

      Reply
  7. Anonymous
    March 7, 2014

    If I could have one wish in this world, it would be that people stopped campaigning to fix other people’s problems, and campaign instead to teach personal responsibility.

    There is so much talk about the dog that actually makes it to the pound and needs rescued. How about the dog sitting in someones backyard that needs it worse? I get to see the dogs who are “family pets” and “loved” by their owners. I’m the one who hears your dog scream in pain as I carefully, gently extract its ingrown nail from its paw pad.

    “Well, they grow so fast.”

    As if that’s okay. As if it’s fine that the dog has had to endure a nail twisting its way through its feet, and having to walk on that, for months, because, gosh dang it! They grow!

    I’m the one who demats your dogs butt so it can poop freely for the first time in God only knows how long, and comforts him when he’s embarrassed because he’s pooped all over the grooming table.

    You never even knew the tennis-ball sized poop/mat/cork was there. You just noticed a smell.

    I’m the one who puts your dog’s teeth in a zip-lock bag and hands it back to you because getting a tooth brushing once yearly is about as far as you go with your dogs dental health, and the dog is the one who pays for it.

    I’m the one who tapes your dog back together to the best of my ability, makes him comfortable and happy, and then watch you throw yourself on the floor like a toddler because you’ve never once brushed your dog in the YEARS you’ve had it, yet you somehow expected me to do all this and “Save the coat” too.

    And now you don’t love your dog anymore because it isn’t fluffy anymore.

    These are the dogs that aren’t in shelters. They were adopted from them.

    I’m sure that it is really a good thing that the dog didn’t die in the shelter, but I feel that it’s really not a good thing that what feels like 90% of the dogs out there are owned by people who don’t give a rip about their pets.

    I think if the average dog owner — not just you who gather online, and blog about pets, and actually know and understand them— but the average dog owner, learned a smidgen of personal responsibility there would be no pets in the shelters.

    That’s just my two cents.

    Reply
    1. sedna101
      March 14, 2014

      So true! Now that I’m old and don’t care if idiots like me or not, I have regular arguements with neighbors about their lack of care for their dogs. I always say that the biggest problem in rescue is finding people who are good enough for the dogs! 🙂

      Reply
    2. Lanster
      January 23, 2015

      BRAVO!!! Outstanding! & on behalf of all those animals you help Thank You. “If I could have one wish in this world, it would be that people stopped campaigning to fix other people’s problems, and campaign instead to teach personal responsibility.” So true.

      Reply
  8. Daniel Albaugh
    March 7, 2014

    It’s great that you are responsible with your companion animals, but you seem to want to ignore the picture of the dog overpopulation crisis in America so that you may rationalize your decisions as a consumer (as if the notion of being a consumer should apply to those we bring into our families). When considering the suffering of others, surely you can agree that there are some things you may want to possess in your life that are not justifiable just because you want them.

    How do you justify the fact that when you promote buying a dog from a breeder you are encouraging others to keep breeding dogs into an already overpopulated society where so many are sick and homeless? With 3 to 4 million dogs being euthanized in American shelters each year, is possible to pay someone to breed more dogs and still consider yourself as part of the solution to the overpopulation crisis? Rather than accept the fact that you are not part of the solution, you defend yourself by saying you are not part of the problem. Well, you are part of the problem, and though I wish you no ill will, I don’t doubt others who care about dogs have been rude to you for no good reason. Despite the facts, you seem to have a princess-like entitlement to whatever you want, as if the big picture of reality does not apply to you.

    Why is it that you insist on buying a dog from someone who stands to profit from breeding dogs when there are foster groups that will allow you to see if a dog is a good fit for your home, and even pay for food and vet bills during the dog’s stay at your home? How about the different rescues which specialize in certain breeds? Or simply volunteering at a shelter until you find a dog with a temperament and character compatible for you and your family?

    Anyone who is willing to do their research as you are is more than capable of finding a perfectly good dog from rescues or shelters. You seem to think a dog is a machine, as if there is a guarantee to what you can purchase from a breeder. You know as well as any of us that dogs are individuals, just as other members of your family, and you cannot always guarantee that they will behave in manners that are agreeable to you. But we have to love them anyway, in spite of their flaws. That is the deal we aim to enter into by bringing animals into our families so long as no one’s well being or safety becomes compromised.

    You say you love dogs and support adoption/rescue programs, but your actions do not support your words. You may love your own dog, and that’s perfectly fine (lucky him), but the unlucky dogs on America’s streets need you to help promote a culture of mercy, adoption, and rescue–not one of consumerism.

    Reply
    1. katcha
      March 13, 2014

      I am all for rescue too,but my dogs are from very reputable breeders,who I am in close contact with. I have always had various dog breeds,but wanted to try showing dogs ,which by the way you can’t get at a rescue.You must rely on a very reputable breeder to get a show potential.I did my homework and bought a wonderful puppy who I learned to show,and he is now an AKC and UKC champion,but mostly he is my baby and part of our family.So sometimes you have to go to a good breeder if showing is in your blood! It has been very fulfilling and my boy loves it!
      There is nothing wrong with a good breeder who is trying to keep the integrity of that breed.

      Reply
      1. Daniel Albaugh
        March 14, 2014

        So just because you want “show” dogs that makes it okay to pay someone else to bring more dogs into the world that is overfilled with dogs who need homes? Just because showing dogs is “in your blood” (which is a lousy excuse) you somehow think it is justified to pay someone to inbreed dogs? Are you aware of congenital problems with inbreeding?

        A lot of people in this discussion seem to think that just because they want a specific thing, they are entitled to get it, as if the individual lives of animals in crisis do not matter. Part of the root of this problem is that many of you are only thinking about yourselves and your own desires to possess something. Try to think about someone else for a change. That someone could be your new best friend–a dog on death row in a shelter. Thanks.

        Reply
        1. Katcha
          March 14, 2014

          Who are you to say it is a lousy excuse to show dogs? It is a privilege to show a pure bred to insure that the breed won’t be over inbred and our dogs are OFA tested for defects and then CHIC certified by qualified Vets,before they are ever bred. We try not to inbreed our lines and have very limited litters.Yes adopting rescues is in demand,which I also have rescued animals,so I am not a monster just because I want to show an appropriate profile of a breed. You need to step back and stop being so judgemental of people that don’t agree with you SIR! Shelters are not for everyone all the time…..

          Reply
          1. Ro
            March 14, 2014

            I also am a reputable breeder and never over breed my line and only have very limited litters.My dogs are NOT INBRED…sire and dam are health tested and OFA’D otherwise we don’t breed,we are not in it for the money and only want to further the quality of our line.Our best do go to show homes that carry on the quality in our lines,you cant find this in shelter dogs,that is why we specialize in show quality,many people want to show dogs but we also have companion dogs in our litters that dont qualify as show pups.Rescues are wonderful,but there is nothing wrong with pure bred animals and showing them for their strong potential for that breed.

            Reply
          2. imasweetp2
            March 15, 2014

            Not all of us want to own a pit bull- that’s what I see in most of the ads for dogs who need homes. It’s just that simple. I was replying to the person after you, Katcha, who removed his comment.

            Reply
    2. sedna101
      March 14, 2014

      The numbers are closer to 5 million pets killed in “shelters” every year in America. Interestingly, over 6 million households get a new pet every year… My life is all about rescue, but I have no problem with those who buy from a truly responsible breeder.

      Reply
  9. SG
    March 7, 2014

    You should write for The Onion.

    Reply
  10. Victoria
    March 7, 2014

    You say you aren’t part of the overpopulation problem but that’s exactly what you are. You’re paying people to create new life when there is already so much life that’s homeless and suffering. Even if you get a bred dog, you still don’t know exactly what it’s personality will be like. Same with human children.
    And yes, my fiancé had a vasectomy and we will be adopting children as well as ALL our animals. Overpopulation is literally killing millions an you’re a part of that slaughter.

    Reply
    1. chris d
      March 7, 2014

      we have a general human overpopulate as well, if you are really committed to saving the planet there is something you can do about that.
      ; )

      Reply
  11. chris d
    March 7, 2014

    Dogs from the shelter are not free, you bought them just the same as you would from a breeder. But I suppose if you keep telling people the sky is purple they will begin to hate the people who say it is a lovely blue.

    Lets be serious, everyone adopted their pets because the only other option is giving birth to them. So…everyone’s pets are adopted and bought but makes for less fighting. I support breeders. I support shelters. But lets be serious, unless you pulled that dog from a burning building, you didn’t “rescue” it, you simply paid the market rate to the shelter which helped a homeless dog find a home. But you aren’t a saint, you’re just a dog lover.

    Reply
    1. Pets Adviser
      March 7, 2014

      You’re aware that millions of dogs/cats are euthanized every year because there’s simply no room at the shelter, right? Then pulling them is a rescue.

      Reply
      1. Violet
        March 9, 2014

        Animals in shelters are killed because the shelter director refuses
        to implement a comprehensive foster care program for neonatal puppies
        and kittens, choosing to kill those animals instead. Killing is occurring in our nation’s shelters not because there are too
        many animals, but because killing is easier than doing what is necessary
        to stop it, and because as heartless as that reason is, shelter
        directors have been allowed to do it anyway. Why? Because the people who
        should be their fiercest critics—those within the animal protection
        movement itself—have provided them political cover by falsely portraying the killing that they do as a necessity born of pet overpopulation.
        In fact, the lie of pet overpopulation is at the heart of the killing
        paradigm. It is the primary excuse that allows shelter directors to
        shift the blame from their own failure to save lives to someone else.
        And it is the excuse that has, for decades, kept the animal protection
        movement wringing its hands, spinning in endless, hopeless circles,
        trying to “solve” the problem of shelter killing by attacking a phantom
        cause, rather than the one that is truly to blame.

        Reply
        1. Daniel Albaugh
          March 14, 2014

          In my hometown there are an estimated 1+ million dogs on the streets, and anytime I have tried to partner with a no-kill program/shelter to help stray animals I have found they are ALWAYS past capacity. Not once have I been able to get an animal in.

          Once my mother paid a pitbull no-kill “refuge” a sponsorship of $700 to save a sweet pitty girl we found, and 2 months later that rescue was raided and declared to be one of the worst hoarding cases in Texas, ever. The no-kill system is a mess, and though it may work on a small scale in some places, it usually has the potential to subject its animals to a miserable life in waiting.

          Anytime I down at the city shelter I see people (usually from poor neighborhoods) bringing in baskets full of puppies or kittens. You can’t tell me the workers in those city shelters don’t do enough to help animals or educate the public. People are not spaying/neutering their animals, they are breeding alarmingly fast on the streets, and not nearly enough people are adopting animals from shelters–in part because of people like the woman who wrote this article who are encouraging people to buy dogs from breeders.

          There are two things in this discussion which are not part of the solution: 1) shaming standard shelters that euthanize, and 2) encouraging people to do anything other than adopt animals from shelters.

          Reply
    2. Jules
      September 11, 2014

      You are an idiot. The adoption fees shelters and rescues charge do not even begin to cover the expenses that went into sheltering, feeding, spaying/neutering, and providing other vet care for the animal. I work at an open admission shelter in the city and we charge anywhere from. $20-$100 adoption fees and sometimes the fee is waived. That fee includes the spay/neuter, age appropriate vaccines, and microchip. All amounting to well over $200. What does the breeder offer? It is not the same thing as purchasing a dog, and you are grossly misinformed if you think it is.

      Reply
      1. Amanda Jo Cantwell
        January 29, 2015

        I hate bad breeders and I love good breeders. I Love good owners and I don’t like bad owners. Good breeders have a contract signed by the puppy owner that is legally binding that includes, spay/neuter will be done, health guarantee, and owner can NEVER give the puppy to anyone other than the breeder of said puppy,s strict requirements on how often dog is vaccinated and how it is treated for life. Good breeders also have an anniversary/birthday party where dogs and owners come back to the breeder’s place for a good time and so the breeder can see the pups are happy and healthy. Good breeders don’t make a profit and sometimes don’t even break even on the cost they put into raising happy healthy puppies. The majority of shelters do not offer what a GOOD BREEDER offers, plain and simple. Also take a look at the true statistics. Good breeders are NOT the reason for even a 5th of the dog’s in shelters. Because they are so selective and picky on how kind and informed the owners will have to be in order to deserve their precious pups.

        Reply
  12. Nick
    March 10, 2014

    “It’s just not my choice.” If you are taking in a pet into your home that is not adopted from a shelter then you are choosing to leave a dog in the shelter. You are part of the problem.

    Reply
    1. Smashly
      November 1, 2014

      You clearly don’t understand the meaning of “choices” or “responsibility”. The choice being made is to add the dog of their own choosing to their household. The responsibility for the problem of shelter dogs belongs to those who bred them and those that gave them up. Next time you state your opinion you should back it up with some facts.

      Reply
    2. Lanster
      January 23, 2015

      You’re simplifying the issue. to quote a previous commenter : “If I could have one wish in this world, it would be that people stopped campaigning to fix other people’s problems, and campaign instead to teach personal responsibility.” Those of us who spend years researching the breed we’re interested in and reputable ethical breeders are the ones who are NOT responsible for the over crowded shelters.

      Reply
  13. Carolyn Wolfe
    March 13, 2014

    I am so sorry that people have been rude to you. All animals deserve loving homes and loving pet parents. My animals are all rescues and yes, my dog was adopted from a shelter. I love all my animals, cats and dogs. The cats had been abandoned, and I work with agencies like Animal Allies, to network and get help for cats as well as other agencies for dogs. As an animal advocate, like most people that have posted on this blog, are, the importance is how the animal is treated! I will always rescue or adopt from a shelter but that is me, and my personal choice. Helping animals should not divide us, it should unite us.

    Reply
    1. Pets Adviser
      March 13, 2014

      Good points, Carolyn. Thanks for commenting.

      Reply
      1. Carolyn Wolfe
        March 13, 2014

        Thank you. And thank you for hosting this very interesting topic!

        Reply
  14. Denise Jones
    March 13, 2014

    I bought my dog too, I’m not blaming the breeder, these things happen, but my dog had to have two operations on her hind legs and her eyelids corrected. Luckily she is our dog and we were willing to pay for it all. In that way maybe I’ve saved a dog too. Goes to show that bought dogs can be needy too.

    Reply
    1. Daniel Albaugh
      March 14, 2014

      Pure-bred dogs=in-bred dogs. It’s why so many pure-bred dogs have hereditary problems and die early or have miserable golden years due to increased risk of cancers, joint pains, physical abnormalities, etc. The limited genepool that pure-breds are born from can often lead to a reduced quality of their lives through poor health–another reason why people should not support breeders.

      Reply
      1. Denise Jones
        March 14, 2014

        I must agree with you on that, the vet did say everything she had was hereditary.

        Reply
      2. Katcha
        March 14, 2014

        Thats pure crap, if you deal with a very reputable AKC endorsed breeder, you will get a pure bread dog that will live up to its pedigree,stop knocking breeders,maybe you’ve never dealt with one that has the integrity to the breed which they are trying to make better.As I stated before, I do show dogs and deal with reputable breeders ,who are committed to making the breed it’s best it can be.

        Reply
  15. Rhonda Hamilton Blaney
    March 13, 2014

    I have been trying to find a dog to adopt for a while now and frankly I am about ready to give up on the whole idea of rescue…I am looking for my special dog..three times now I have found dogs I would like to bring into my home and all three times I have been let down…one wouldn’t allow me to adopt because I was 4 hours away in another county….the others were on waiting lists of which I was not first….maybe if it weren’t so difficult to adopt from a rescue more would do it…just my two cents

    Reply
    1. disappointed rescue dog owner
      August 31, 2014

      Exactly. Some (not all) rescues make it impossible to adopt, it’s harder than adopting a child. I’ve had rescues in the past and I’ve come to realize that they are not the dogs for me, they all had separation anxiety and other deep rooted issues. The 3rd greyhound I had came to me with Lyme disease & hookworms, $1000 to treat. I was not reimbursed by the rescue after I contacted them informing them of the issue. He was returned two times prior to me adopting him because he chewed. He doesn’t chew anything, he is severely neurotic and can’t be left alone without being drugged first or he shakes and pees and poops all over my house & howls the entire time I’m gone. Who wants a dog like that? Granted he was probably abused but the rescue lied to me. I asked if he was house trained and they said yes. This dog goes in the house whenever he wants, never lets me know when he has to go out, just lifts his leg whenever he pleases. I was told he was good with kids- he bit two, he was not provoked either time. The only thing they didn’t lie to me about was him being good with cats, he could careless about them. If they had been honest with me, I never would’ve ‘rescued’ this dog. The next dog I get will be from a reputable breeder, no more rescues for me.

      Reply
  16. Rufadoo
    March 13, 2014

    I think it is terrible that strangers/friends felt they had the right to negatively comment on your purchase from a breeder. It is never acceptable to behave that way.
    I would like to discuss, however, WHY people feel the need to buy their purebreed dogs. I think the biggest reason is for ‘looks’–that’s what purebred companion animals are about. If your prerequisite was a big dog that was gentle and good with children then you could most certainly have found one at a Shelter; big gentle dogs are not wanting in a lot of Humane Societies or Shelters who test and screen them. We have also been trained to think that purebred dogs can offer us a “better” experience and a predictable one based on long-time groups like the AKC that propagate the idea that certain breed-lines come bred with certain ‘personality’. I volunteer in a shelter and over the years have seen so many aggressive Labs, retrievers that have seriously bitten, etc, etc. I believe it is much more the environment that any dog is brought to that will develop their character. I have found that the people I know who have purchased their purebred dogs depend far too heavily on the breed standard to deliver a personality type instead of working to help the dogs become the best they can be through acceptable physical, mental and social interactions and training.

    Reply
  17. MKG
    March 13, 2014

    I bought my Labrador Retriever from a breeder. I did look into a local Lab Rescue Group but the representative turned me off. I asked about health checks that they do for their dogs especially hip dysplasia & when she told me they don’t check for health problems and if I should get a dog with hip dysplasia just put him down. I found her attitude very cold. That was when I turned to the lab breeder that was friends with my vet. I’ve had 2 labs from her. My 1st lab lived to be 15 and never had a problem with his hips and the same is true for the lab I have now who will soon be 9 years old. I also have a rescued collie mixed.

    Reply
  18. Susan L McPherson
    March 13, 2014

    I am a volunteer for a dog rescue and this is a much heated debate in our community. In rescue everyone advocates for adoption either from a shelter or rescue. A lot of purebreds can be found in both. But before I even knew about rescues I got my first dog from a breeder and when someone asked I would tell them. I did get a lot of negative remarks and reactions and was taken back because I really did not have an understanding of the world of rescue. Now I adopt my dogs from rescues but try not to judge people who don’t. My biggest issue is not buying from a reputable breeder but buying from a pet store where the puppies come from puppy mills and often are very sickly or end up getting pretty sick.

    Reply
  19. cmac324
    March 13, 2014

    I don’t believe in breeding dogs for money when there are dogs whose lives depend on getting a good home. It’s that simple in my mind. It just breaks my heart that dogs are being killed just because someone is buying a dog from a breeder instead of from a shelter. I guess it comes down to your reason for wanting a dog in the first place.

    Reply
    1. Lanster
      January 23, 2015

      Your logic is a bit off IMO. “It just breaks my heart that dogs are being killed just because someone is buying a dog from a breeder instead of a shelter” Is that why the dog is being killed? Really? Or is that dog in the shelter dying because the person(s) who were supposed to be responsible for it were painfully irresponsible? again..to quote a previous commenter: ” If I could have one wish in this world, it would be that people stopped campaigning to fix other people’s problems, and campaign instead to teach personal responsibility.”

      Reply
  20. Pia
    March 13, 2014

    I can’t believe that people are being rude and upset because you chose to buy your dog! It’s every ones own decision. No one can tell you nor me what to do! The sad thing is that lots of people get dogs as they were toys you play with for a while and when you are fed up you just let go!!

    Reply
  21. SeaSawMaria
    March 13, 2014

    I think purchasing from a responsible breeder is great. I also think adopting from the shelter is great. I have both. I will probably always have both because I think it’s the right thing to do. This Fall, we will have two shelter dogs and one purebred.

    Reply
  22. mary anne
    March 13, 2014

    I think adopting from a shelter is wonderful. Around this area all you find at the shelters are pitbulls. I am sorry, I am afraid of that breed. I consider my dogs to be a rescue from a petshop. At the time I had birds. I went to this pet store for bird food. There was a new puppy there that I fell totally in love with. After a few weeks I did purchase him. I have had him now for 6 years & I would never give him up. I am totally in love with him. A year later I went and purchased another. They are my life. Get your animals where ever you can. Just love them forever.

    Reply
    1. Daniel Albaugh
      March 14, 2014

      So you paid a business that supports puppy mills so that you could “rescue” your dogs? Don’t confuse your terms here. Buying from a pet store financially supports the worst of the worst and does not “rescue” anyone except for the animal you took home with you. In the long run, you are funding inhumane business practices. Do a little research about pet stores please, and for the dogs’ sake, please don’t give your money to stores that sell dogs or cats int he future.

      Reply
  23. virginilou
    March 13, 2014

    Whether you buy from a “reputable” breeder or someone else, you are encouraging the intentional breeding of dogs. Why is that a problem? Because of the hundreds of thousands of dogs who are euthanized in shelters every year simply because there isn’t enough space, there are more dogs than there are available homes for them. Think about that word: euthanized. It means KILLED. Those dogs lost their lives, basically because there isn’t enough room in the world for them.
    Having said that, I realize that responsible breeders are not the main problem with pet overpopulation. It’s the people who fail to spay/neuter, or the backyard breeders who make their poor mother dogs crank out as many litters as possible until they simply wear out. But intentionally breeding dogs, no matter what the circumstances, does add to the problem. Now, it’s a free country and you are not obligated to adopt an unwanted shelter dog. Still, I just would hope that more people would. I personally wouldn’t take a million bucks for any of my shelter mongrels…every one of which would be dead right now if I hadn’t adopted them. It breaks my heart to even think about it.

    Reply
  24. Avis Ayers
    March 13, 2014

    While I personally currently have four rescue dogs, I have also owned full blood AKC dogs in the past. I do support rescues and adoptions 200%. At the same I also realize that without responsible breeders, there will be no more German shepherds, Dalmatians, Boxers, St Bernards, Newfies, Dobies, Shibas, etc. I would never refuse to pet any dog based on where the dog was bought from. That is as crazy an idea as people thinking my pit bulls are vicious mean dogs that will eat your face out based solely on their looks!! 🙂 I love all dogs!!!

    Reply
    1. Lanster
      January 23, 2015

      Thank you!

      Reply
  25. Vickie B
    March 13, 2014

    I don’t know who your friends are that make such hurtful
    comments to you but they are obviously not your friends. If they were
    they would understand or make an effort to understand why you made the decision
    to purchase a dog rather than adopt one.

    My two dogs are rescue dogs but in my past I have also
    purchased dogs because there was a certain breed and temperament I wanted in
    the dog I got. There are many reasons people choose to purchase a pet
    rather than rescue a pet. And purchasing a pet should not cause you to be
    shunned by others. The person that told you they wouldn’t touch the dog
    you purchased is obviously not a pet lover. If they were it wouldn’t
    matter where you got the new member of your family from. Maybe
    that person needs to look deep within themselves to find out if they should
    have a pet.

    It is always best to rescue an animal if possible but
    there are many situations where that is not the best thing to do for you or
    your family. If you have small children and the adoption agency in your
    area doesn’t really do a good job of testing a dog or cat’s temperament
    before they put them up for adoption. Then you are taking the risk you
    could be bringing home a dog that isn’t well suited to be around small
    children. This isn’t always the case but it could happen.

    Choosing your new family member is a personal choice that
    only the person getting the new member can make. And, as you said, you
    are not the problem here. The problem is with the irresponsible people
    who get a pet because it is a cute little puppy and then realize it is too
    hyper or too big or smaller than they thought it would be or howls a lot
    because it is a beagle and they didn’t know beagles do that. So these people
    just take the pet to the pound and get another pet and go through the same
    thing. Or they have an animal, which is not really a pet or family member
    to them, and when they get tired of it they take it to a neighborhood and
    drop it off thinking someone else with take care of their problem, or they
    abuse the animal because it is not what they really wanted, and on and on and
    on…. Those are the people that are the problem.

    And in my opinion, they should be treated exactly the way
    they treated their loving pet who didn’t do anything to deserve this treatment.
    The person just made a poor choice as a pet owner and didn’t research to
    find what type of pet would best suit their schedule, family unit
    lifestyle, etc…

    Sorry for my rant there at the end but I get very angry
    when I see someone abusing or mistreating an animal and it make me sick there
    aren’t more serious punishments to people who do these things.

    In closing, I don’t think you did anything wrong by purchasing your dog. You did a lot of research
    and decided what type of dog you wanted. You made sure you waited to
    purchase the dog until you knew you would be able to give the dog the time and
    energy it needed to make it a happy member of your family and I congratulate
    you on how you made your decision. I just wish everyone else would do the
    same. I did the research before I adopted my two dogs to ensure I was
    getting a breed that would fit into my lifestyle so that I would be able to give
    them the time, energy and love they needed to be my babies and happy members of my family.

    Reply
  26. Adele casden
    March 14, 2014

    I believe there is nothing wrong with choosing to buy a dog from a responsible dog breeder. That way you can determine the traits of the dog that will become a member of your family. It is also wonderful to adopt a dog from a dog shelter. It is difficult to adopt one of these dogs, as some have a lot of problems, and it can be a real sacrifice to adopt one. You have to be able to stay home and devote a lot of time and patience, to help them adjust to your family. Not everyone has the right personality to help one of these neglected dogs. Either way, being a pet owner is a privilege and a big responsibility. You really have to love your dog to be a good dog owner.

    Reply
  27. Donna Everhart
    March 14, 2014

    Like many other sensitive and inflammatory topics, there is no right or wrong answer here. It’s simply about choices. You might choose to be a Republican or a Democrat. You might choose to be a believer in Christ or an atheist. You might choose to believe in global warming or not. You might choose to adopt a dog from a shelter or get one from a breeder.

    It’s nobody’s business but your own, what you chose to do. It’s your life, your money, your decision. It’s rude, invasive, presumptious, and judgmental for anyone else to tell you what you should have or shouldn’t have done.

    I look at it like this, you’ve given a dog a home. You were careful and thoughtful about it But, how you went about it should only matter to you and how you ultimately felt. The rest of us should butt out. This is like somebody deciding to get pregnant, and someone else saying, “But there are so many children you could have adopted!”

    Personal choices are called that for a reason.

    Reply
    1. Daniel Albaugh
      March 14, 2014

      Sorry, but this goes beyond the issue of personal choice. It affects every dog that is waiting for a home, or every dog that is sick on the streets fighting for its life. Privileged people always insist on issues being a matter of personal choice so that they don’t have to look at the reality of the big picture. Shame on the woman who wrote this article for promoting the consumerism of domesticated animals.

      Reply
      1. Donna Everhart
        March 14, 2014

        I respectfully (but wholeheartedly) disagree. What is “privileged” anyway. I know you aren’t talking about me, or this author, because you don’t know either of us. When you talk about “consumerism of domesticated animals,” you might as well include all farmers who raise cattle, dairy cattle, hogs, chickens, etc. for consumption.

        As long as irresponsible people continue to allow their pets to roam without spaying/neutering, as long as irresponsible people continue to drop off unwanted pets at shelters with flimsy excuses, as long as people abandon their animals and however many other ways there are to end up with the mess we have today, this problem will exist. Blame the irresponsible – not someone like the author, who gave an animal a permanent home.

        And, I still stand by what I said. It’s her business. Not yours, not mine.

        Last, I’ve been on both sides of this – my first two dogs came from a veterinarian who also bred, and my current is “adopted,” from a foster home.

        Reply
        1. Daniel Albaugh
          March 14, 2014

          Donna, to be clear what I specifically mean by “privileged” in this case is to be in a position where you don’t have to witness the reality of overcrowded shelters that have no choice but to euthanize hundreds of unwanted animals each week…or even more so, you don’t have to be one of those animals yourself.

          The people who are defending the author here are simply not empathizing what it would be like to work in a shelter or be an animal in a shelter. I realize that your current dog is adopted, and that’s great, but to openly defend someone’s consumer right that does indeed bring harm to others is worthy of criticism. So criticism she is receiving.

          Please take the “you don’t know me” argument back to the girls’ bathroom in high school. I am sure you are kind and considerate on many levels, and that your attempt to defend the author is an attempt to be a nice, non-judgmental person, but the woman who wrote this article is aware of the dog overpopulation crisis, but she’s choosing to disregard it simply because she wants something her way. She may be a nice person on many levels too, but this article is harmful to dogs in shelters because it helps people feel justified about not adopting, so she may as well live with the consequence of her decision: to be ridiculed for it. I am glad many people around her see her behavior as a problem. It gives me hope that the mentality of America in regard to companion animals is changing for the better.

          I blame all the irresponsible people the author criticizes, sure. And I blame the author. She’s not part of the solution either, and in fact, by promoting anything other than adopting dogs from shelters, she is potentially adding to the problem. As long as their are throngs of homeless dogs on the city’s streets, this is everyone’s business.

          P.S. I am glad you are able to make the connection that we ought to extend the same considerations to domesticated animals that do not live in our homes, but for the sake of not making the debate too wide-ranged, I do not intend to discuss the ethical issues regarding farmed animals here.

          Reply
          1. Donna Everhart
            March 14, 2014

            ‘Please take the “you don’t know me” argument back to the girls’ bathroom in high school,’ was really uncalled for, not the sort of reply that is helpful.

            You can’t presume to know what anyone else knows about shelter dogs/cats. I’m quite up to speed on the numbers, quite sensitive and emotional about euthanasia. Well versed on the odds of any dog/cat finding a home – no matter where they come from.

            You also said: “the woman who wrote this article is aware of the dog overpopulation
            crisis, but she’s choosing to disregard it simply because she wants
            something her way.”

            I’m simply of the belief that she gets to do what she wants, within the laws, because that’s the way it works here. There are a lot of ways to help stop animals from ending up in a shelter. One is to be a responsible pet owner, and because she is, it is one less dog that will end up in a shelter.

            Reply
      2. Katcha
        March 14, 2014

        You are nuts…why are you so full of yourself,that you disagree with every option out there…Donna I agree with you… IT IS FREE CHOICE…..giving any animal a good home is what it is all about… Breeder or shelter these shelters around my area charge 600 bucks to get their rescues! so COME ON… they arent in it for some profit? get real Daniel!!!!! If you can get the best from a show breeder …is their any difference in shelling out big bucks at a NO KILL RESCUE!!

        Reply
        1. Daniel Albaugh
          March 14, 2014

          Katcha, I have not been defending no-kill shelters in the slightest on here. City run/standard shelters that charge a lot for adoptions are likely underfunded by local governments and have to compensate for expenses somehow. Medical care and food for dogs, as you know, ain’t cheap. My sympathies are with those operations because they are constantly trying to put a band-aid on the festering wound of this overpopulation crisis, and the situation simply will not improve as long as people are taking to the internet to write articles about how they don’t feel guilty about leaving dogs on death row in shelters.

          Nevertheless, city shelters offer discount adoption opportunities all the time–usually before a purging of shelter animals must be done. It is a sad reality, and I am not sure how you can try to whitewash your conscience of this problem behind a veil of “personal choice.” Fortunately, we do live in a relatively free consumer society where we are free to purchase nearly anything we could want within the bounds of the law, but unfortunately, it doesn’t mean everything you can purchase is ethical or without harm to others. Cigarette, anyone?

          Reply
          1. Katch
            March 14, 2014

            Actually, I am not trying to white wash anything,when getting a dog at a shelter,some people are not equipped to handle the expense of taking care of these abandoned dogs,which usually have deep seated problems if they are up in age,emotional,and physical problems ,which can be very expensive to take care of.Vets don’t care that it is a shelter dog,its .. 45.00 bucks.. office call and then the list go;s on, I know first hand what happens when you take in a cast away, you better plan on opening up your wallet!!!! My orphan cost me big bucks! So, I do know …you have no idea what your getting into when you go to a shelter and BUY a pet from them…..I will take my chances with a qualified breeder, who has already done the homework for me,after all, I want an animal to love not break the bank,esp when I am now retired!!!! We can’t save the whole world you know,so I will give my love to something I can afford!!

            Reply
          2. danston30
            December 2, 2014

            You’re also responsible for millions of children dying in Africa too. Just using your twisted logic here…

            Reply
            1. Lanster
              January 23, 2015

              Ha!

        2. Donna Everhart
          March 15, 2014

          Thanks for that, Katcha!

          Reply
    2. Amanda
      February 16, 2015

      I would have to agree with Donna. I know this is an old artical but I couldnt resist commenting. I own a newfoundland and a great pyrenees. Both of which I bought from breeders. In doing so I have two dogs who I love and care for whole heartedly and I hold no resentment for them of any kind. When my elderly GP needed surgery costing me over 1000 dollars i scrounged up the money with no regrets. They are the exact dogs I knew they would be. They have the characteristics of the kind of dogs I love. They fit my lifestyle and family like a glove. Do pets die in shelters, yep everyday…but not my pets. If it were not for breeders there would be no breeds. If everyone spayed and neutered there would be no dogs period.
      I volunteer at my local shelter so I see dogs put down all the time. dogs that someone bought without considering what kind of responsibility that entailed. its not the responsible breeders or the responsible pet owners that are at fault. Its the irrisponsible ones.
      I love dogs and I love living in a country where I have rights.
      Some people just suck.

      Reply
  28. MIPonder
    March 14, 2014

    There is a negative stigma to buying a dog of a particular breed?! Nobody told the hundreds of *poo mix owners around here, and they proudly advertise their purchases anytime they get the chance! Still, I hope there IS enough fear of shame and social dissaproval in the near future to prevent people buying a “purebred” dog in a pet store, from a Craigslist ad, or on the side of the road (I’ve honestly seen this more times than you’d believe!!). I fully support that kind of negative stigma. The shelters are full from those kind of purchases as much as from careless neglectful people failing to spay/neuter their pets. My own parents are the dupes of a purchase like that getting dumped on them by a family member who relinquished the responsibility when something glitzier came along.

    I would not group people like Jennifer with people whose careless pet purchases deserve negative stigma, though! Her many hours of preparation for her purchased pet seem too similar to the process people of good character I’ve known have gone through to adopt a child.

    I think anyone can be a responsible purebred pet purchaser.

    -Attend dog shows (there are so many kinds to choose from – confirmation and obedience and agility and field trials come to mind),
    – Meet breeders in their homes (reputable breeders don’t fear the public’s opinion and don’t fear for their safety since it should be such a necessary part of the pet purchase process),
    – See the potential pets’ older offspring via photos and post-purchase networks (play dates?),
    – Bide your time until “the planets align!”
    You aren’t really making a purchase are you? You’re putting a relatively small amount of your discretionary income into a system that’s enriched your life and produced something more valuable than a few bucks can account for.

    Why do people keep “adopting” I wonder? They’re making a purchase, but not from a very reputable source! Also, purchasing from a shelter or a rescue group for a pet seems, to me, to propagate the problems of pet overpopulation. I also feel sorry for the people who can’t say “no” to another foster pet and one day realize they’ve been neglecting themselves even more than their very overcrowded pets. It’s not my job to help them but I don’t have to contribute. When that jerk down the street is responsible for yet another litter of kittens, does he think he’ll have to face the horror of euthanizing them? No. He thinks someone in a shelter somewhere will take care of them. Absolve him of his carelessness and give him free rein to continue. Or her.

    I caution people who are thinking of adopting from a shelter/orgainzation to research the place and be careful. Stay on top of the responsibility they owe you after the adoption. You’re not supposed to be cut off from their support after you give them your money for the pet they provide you. (A responsible breeder would not abandon you after the purchase of a purebred, by the way). Wanting a second cat, I had decided to forego my inclination to adopt another purebred in favor of purchasing one from a local group. Over the course of three months, all the rescue groups denied me access to facilities, I was told the few existing no-kill shelters were only open by appointment made at least 24 hours in advance, I was told the pound (wretched stinking disease-ridden place) was only open for a few hours of visiting each day. Fostered pets were taken to area pet stores (I live near Houston – LOTS of pet stores here), so chances were rare to meet people who had cared for the pets much less see where they were born, how they were treated. I attended numerous pet “adoption” events and spoke to many of the volunteers. For the most part they mean well, but they’re not generally doing well. I finally found the one cat I wanted, a hefty silky long-haired kitten. Then realized he had a brother! I made the emotional decision to bring home two additions to the family! I’ve been happy with them, but – geez louise! – there have been problems due to where they came from.

    I seriously doubt I’d trust my next pet purchase to some non-profit pet group! I’m cautions about shelters and organizations because my extensive interviewing of them led me to the belief they are dumping grounds for the same kinds of people over and over, who should instead be responsible enough to stop causing pet overpopulation problems in the first place. (That’s why the same kind of pets show up over and over.) I’m also cautious because I discovered the conditions that even foster pets are kept in are mainly overcrowded and unsanitary. (That was why both my “rescue” group cats were sick with Calici Virus and have had problems all their lives.) I’m cautious because the promise of vet care after the “adoption” will hardly ever be high quality or properly dispensed. (That’s why one of my cats suffered during a routine procedure and has had costly problems ever since, and why both cats from the “rescue” group were almost overdosed on a deworming medicine.) I’m cautious because my observations have led me to believe most “rescue” groups are really just in the business as a way of making money for themselves. (While at the group’s designated vet, I saw kittens known to be seriously sick that were still offered for adoption)

    Still, I’m not wholly opposed to the existence of shelters and rescue groups. There are a few with good ethics and follow-up out there. And… Sometimes the perfectly right pet comes from such a source, completely unexpectedly, right? I was picking up food for my cat when I met my perfect dog in the middle of a Petsmart aisle, fast asleep amidst the chaos and noise of an event to push pets out of their foster homes into permanent ones. I had lost my responsibly-chosen Pembroke Corgi to old age and when I saw the little four-month old chocolate brown Scottish Terrier/Dachshund/Chihuahua/mutt mix, I knew she was the perfect dog for me. She has some problems that we’ll have to deal with all her life, like her luxating patella due to poor quality breeding from her Chihuahua ancestors, and a very good possibility of hip dysplasia in her elder years, maybe ten years. I don’t have a breed support system to refer me to vets or meds. Still, I can’t imagine my life would be without her, and it’s kinda neat to have a dog nobody has ever seen the likes of, so I can’t begrudge shelters entirely…..

    It’s Friday, and there is a great activity-filled weekend ahead. I kept myself online far too long, and I’ve probably written enough for a book here! What it all boils down to is… Have a happy and long partnership with your pet regardless of where s/he came from!! 🙂

    Reply
  29. Lauren Kramer
    March 19, 2014

    As the proud mother of 6 adopted fur babies, I can tell you that my loyalty lies with those that adopt. Adoption saves two lives. I fear that many breeders are simply in the business to make money. Case in point, my husband and I recently adopted a double dapple Dachshund. She came from a backyard breeder who did not know that you are not supposed to breed two dapples together. The result? Hope was born without eyes and is deaf. Thankfully, she has an incredible zest for life and loves everyone.

    Furthermore, my mom purchased a Chihuahua from a breeder. He did not live more than 3 months before he passed due to complications with the gas he received while being neutered. While Poppi’s passing was very tragic, things may have been different if he were of a mixed breed. Numerous studies have shown that non-purebreds are typically healthier than their purebred counterparts.

    While I am a staunch adoption supporter, I feel that as long as the purchased dog is getting the love that he/she deserves, I see no real problem with purchasing a pet.

    Reply
    1. Lanster
      January 23, 2015

      Why is it that no one sees that not all breeders are in it for the money? Many are in it for the passion they have for the breed. Hunting dogs, service dogs, cattle dogs, ranch dogs. I’m sorry but you can’t herd cattle with a Pomeranian/Chihuahua/min pin mutt.

      Reply
  30. Ann
    March 20, 2014

    I find it amazing how ignorant people can be. If you spent the same amount of time of searching for your special breed in a shelter you would find what you are looking for. You would also make room for another dog that is in need of a safety. The shelters are full of pure bred dogs! In my perfect world all breeding would stop until every animal has a home. I have picked many pure bred dogs up off the streets. With love, good vet care and good food they have turned into amazing beautiful dogs.
    Lets face it; it all get back to statis. Maybe one day it will be “cool” to own mix breed.

    Reply
    1. Nyxborn Wolf
      December 10, 2014

      Shelters are full of ‘purebred’ dogs from puppy mills and backyard breeders, that can come with a host of health and temperament problems. I have been looking for a dog – not necessarily a purebred – for MONTHS and have met several, and none of them meet my ridiculously high standards (has to have a good temperament, medium to low energy, and ignore my cats.) Aside from that, most rescues want to call your vet and three personal references and take 3-4 weeks to process an application, and by that time more often than not the dog you were looking at initially has been adopted. I’m exhausted and discouraged and more than ready to get my well-researched chosen breed from an equally well-researched, reputable breeder.

      Reply
    2. Lanster
      January 23, 2015

      I spent 4 years looking for a 6 month-1 year old GSP in shelters all across the country! I never found what I was looking for, (no it had nothing to do with having a cute puppy and everything to do with training and behavioral development from as early as possible) so I started researching reputable breeders. It’s an incorrect assumption that those of us spending time researching our “special breed” aren’t also looking at shelters and rescue programs. I donate money to rescues, and one day I plan to rescue a GSP and hopefully many other animals if I have the time money and space to do so of coarse. The problem does not lie with people who are responsible and get pure breads it lies with irresponsible breeders and owners and people who have no business having pets in the first place. & for the record it’s extremely cool to own a mix breed! 🙂

      Reply
  31. Ragdoll Mommy
    May 8, 2014

    I totally agree with you. Now personally I’ve never owned any type of dog, be it mutt or purebred, but I do own 2 mutt cats that I got from the shelter and 2 Ragdoll cats that I didn’t get from any shelter (. Ragdoll is a breed of cat), and I love both equally. If I was to get a dog ever it would probably be a purebred. 🙂

    Reply
  32. Amanda Jo Moss
    July 23, 2014

    Well, I know this is an older article, but I loved it just the same. First to start off, I’m an animal lover. Any animal, really. As a child growing up, we always had at least four dogs and three cats on the farm. When I became a young adult living in a city, I adopted two cats, and they were my first children. Since then, I married a military man, and we have a beautiful sweet little boy. I donate supplies to local shelters, and “babysit” our friend’s pets for free when they leave on vacation. But, when I decided to BUY an AKC registered Labrador Retriever, I was judged harshly by some. I did not buy my son’s puppy brother because I’m a snob or because I needed a pretty piece of paper to wave around. I did not see a movie and purchase the same breed of dog. I did not go to a pet shop and purchase him “because he is sooo cute!!” I bought my new furry baby over a year ago, because my toddler was diagnosed with Autism and has many social issues. I know the breed of dog and the temperament, I did my research on where to find who we needed, I met the owners/breeders, I had my son interact with the puppies’ parents, and finally it was our puppy who chose my son. I needed a gentle, patient, active, and an eager to please dog. He had to love the water and the outdoors. He needed curiosity, but also intelligence. He had to be sturdy and strong. He had to have a sense of humor, the ability to forgive, and the need to play. I needed him to have a clean slate, and he needed to grow to understand my little boy. This dog was not going to be a temporary choice or “when we got bored/frustrated we gave him away” choice, we needed him to be a forever choice. I get that a rescue/adoption would have been more saintly. But, I made an educated decision to fit my family. If it had been just me, sure a rescue or adopted dog would have been fine. But, we needed something special and specific. I wouldn’t change a thing. He is a miracle and they are inseparable. Yeah, he is a dog, but because of his breed, he was able to give my little boy a best friend.

    Reply
  33. dave bowen
    July 30, 2014

    Remember this,there is no such thing as an animal,dog or cat,that was born mean or aggressive,regardless of the breed. Vicious animals are created not born,by mean,abusive,anti social,HUMANS. Most dogs,with a little love and patience can be rehabilitated. So if you encounter a “vicious” dog. Do not blame the dog. BEWARE THE HUMAN!!!!

    Reply
    1. Nyxborn Wolf
      December 10, 2014

      Absolutely NOT true. Certain lines of dogs that have been bred to be ‘attack’ or fighting dogs have aggressive tendencies bred into their line. Ever hear of dogs attacking or killing people and their owners saying “I’ve had them since they were a puppy, they’ve never done anything like this before”? That owner wasn’t necessarily abusive, but they could’ve been a poor owner in other ways (letting the dog always get its way) and that is more likely to happen in a breed with known aggression problems (like Rottweilers) than, say, a well-bred Golden Retriever.

      Reply
  34. BrooklynBeast
    November 24, 2014

    I agree. I am buying an 8 week old pug for my boys for Christmas. I researched the breed i wanted and know what i am getting. Personally i would never risk a shelter dog with my kids. I don’t know its temperament or medical history. And could care less what people who aren’t living under my roof feel about my decision. As far as the cost well how much money do you waste on trivial things you no longer own? I’d rather invest my hard earned money on a wise investment that’ll bring years of joy and happiness to my family.

    Reply
  35. Jess
    January 18, 2015

    I am certainly not against adopting whatsoever…I know exactly what I want in a dog – height, weight, temperament, puppy, and fur type. I know what my dream dog is, and just as I was getting ready to adopt my Vizsla, my coworkers & family members convinced me that I was doing the wrong thing and that I needed to adopt. I fell for it, adopting an 8 week old lab mix from the shelter. I love him with all my heart, but till this day we just don’t have the connection and he isnt exactly what I would like in a dog – he is not velcro and he is not meant for long endurance trail running so I have to leave him home most of the time…And I still long for my Vizsla. Hopefully in the next few years I will be taking home my vizsla puppy and my lab mix will have a sibling. No regret next time.

    Reply
    1. Lanster
      January 23, 2015

      Go get that vizsla!

      Reply
  36. ladyribenaberet
    November 18, 2015

    I’m pretty sure you’re one of the worst people I’ve encountered. You’re full of absolute rubbish. Why would a shelter dog be too much to handle? Just train them. I have a wonderful two year old rescue who hasn’t caused me a single jot of trouble and she was only nine months when I got her. You’re trying to justify a morally repugnant decision, and yes dogs did die because of that decision. It doesn’t matter how carefully you research a breeder (literally, who cares), they are still a breeder and there are too many dogs in the country as it is. You’re selfish and lazy, please don’t try to dress it up as compassion.

    Reply
    1. LongIslandJoe
      January 10, 2016

      You realize it is ok to adopt a dog from a shelter and it is ok to buy a dog from a breeder right? Everyone is different. I always say to those people..I hope if you have any kids you are adopting all the ones that need a home and not giving birth to them! Don’t judge..everyone has an opinion..no one is wrong. End of story.

      Reply
      1. Melissa Smith
        January 10, 2016

        Hi LongIslandJoe! You’re right — if someone is looking to purchase a dog instead of rescue, that is perfectly OK too. The only thing that I struggle with are people who enable puppy mills by continuing to buy from sketchy places like flea markets and from “breeders” who cannot produce the proper paperwork and veterinary documentation. 🙂

        Reply
      2. Matt
        February 17, 2016

        this isn’t about peoples rights, its about dead dogs…buying dogs should be outlawed the same way buying children is….and your argument is kinda insane imho, unless you know of someone who can give birth to their own dog….why do we care more about humans feelings than dogs lives???? this sucks

        Reply
        1. Kuvasz Breeder of Merit
          February 24, 2016

          So there’s children starVing in Africa, how can Americans have babies?

          Reply
          1. Matt
            February 24, 2016

            no its more like saying i really want to adopt a child but i can only love a white one…thats closer id say…NO HUMAN BIRTHS A DOG…that is a ludicrous argument, its always adoption and you’re saying adopting a cute one is more worthy of life than an ugly one is an ok proposition, and i think its an ugly way to approach the world…in essence

            Reply
        2. ouinaturals
          August 11, 2016

          If you give anyone money for a dog (including shelters or a rescue), you just BOUGHT a dog, my friend. Adoption is for human babies, where no money exchanges hands.

          Reply
          1. Matt
            August 11, 2016

            you obviously have never gone through the adoption process where there are tons of fees, just like with adopting animals, fees…my point is that you cannot biologically have a dog, so comparing it with human adoptions is completely off topic to me. dogs about to be murdered can be adopted (my fee was $35 including all neutering, first check up, etc). you’re just missing my point i think, if you think its about money, its about letting dogs die because you want a specific one from a breeder. thats cruel in my opinion.

            Reply
            1. Justice True
              August 13, 2016

              Nobody lets a dog die because they got one from a breeder. Nor did the breeder kill any dogs. Those dogs were all bred, in the shelters and rescue, too. They just were cast off. Or, they’re from other countries, because they’re cute and popular, but we won’t get into that… The dogs obtained from reputable, knowledgable breeders usually stay in the homes. They have a support, educator, and someone who will take back a pup. Plus won’t put one in an unsuitable home. More of that, and less deaths. You have it all backasswards.

            2. Matt
              August 13, 2016

              have you been to kill shelters? you stated not all dogs should live….im pretty much done there…youre lost to me sorry

            3. Justice True
              August 13, 2016

              Then maybe you should read what I said. You took it to mean that somehow all dogs in shelters need to die lol. No. Rescues often save dogs that are not suitable for pet homes that are not dog savvy, and aren’t trainers. The dog ends up dead anyway, but there’s an accident first, someone is hurt, or worse. So that’s what I mean, people breeding indiscriminately, and putting out dogs with horrible temperament.

            4. al smith
              August 13, 2016

              guess what dogs cannot be “murdered” .. if they could then every shelter worker would be on trial as an accomplice to murder so your little analogy is completely off base

            5. Matt
              August 13, 2016

              i think killing a dog is murder…thats really your point here? I’m not talking legally, I’m speaking ethically, morally…sorry if that wasn’t clear

          2. Frank Sansotta
            August 12, 2016

            Human adoption is free? ARE YOU SERIOUS?

            Reply
        3. Justice True
          August 13, 2016

          WTF? Outlaw buying dogs?! They are not children. This extremist, brain-dead view is repugnant. It’s not overpopulation, it’s stupid people who are irresponsible, and get rid of, then obtain, then get rid of, and obtain, and have false expectations, are lazy, uneducated (it’s not hard folks..) and expect Lassie. Or a baby in a fur suit. For me, I’m grateful that I was able to buy a well bred working line dog, with stable temperament, and working ability to do the things I wish to do with him. Which also fulfills his life. There are too many poorly bred, backyard dogs with crap temperaments, that average pet owners can’t deal with.

          Reply
          1. Matt
            August 13, 2016

            yeah all those who adopt are lazy etc etc etc, the amount of abuse thrown at people trying to help a dog slated for death is sickening to me…we just don’t see the world the same way…not at all, dogs aren’t here for us to own in my opinion, we are this earth with them and are doing a terrible job at it. look at the editor disclaimer, they and pretty much all animal rights groups favor adoption in general over buying animals, but i guess they’re all wrong too…

            Reply
            1. Justice True
              August 13, 2016

              I’m not abusing anyone helping dogs. I help dogs. It’s the opinion you have, that is brainwashing from the animal rights agenda, which sees to end pet ownership. So no more breeding, and within a short time, the only dogs available are going to be street dogs from other countries, and then nothing.

          2. Matt
            August 13, 2016

            you should take a deep breath, you’re being nasty and theres no reason

            Reply
      3. Kuvasz Breeder of Merit
        February 24, 2016

        Last I checked we are American wit frredom of choice. There’s kids starving in Africa, so why do we still eat?

        Reply
        1. Matt
          February 24, 2016

          sure free, but not always right

          Reply
    2. Kuvasz Breeder of Merit
      February 24, 2016

      Why aren’t you harassing the real culprits those who let their pit bulls and pit mixes have puppies?

      You are morally repugnant to allow unchecked breeding of breeds and mixes that are unadoptable.

      Pit bull and mixes make up the vast majority of dogs in rescue and that are euthanized. Sorry, the reason there’s so many dogs in shelters is because they were poorly bred mixes. Why are you not doing anything about that? For every mixed breed born, shelter dogs die.

      Reply
      1. Matt
        February 24, 2016

        i have no idea what you are talking about-sincerely…waht is wrong with mis breed pit bulls?? you’ll pass, fine, but their some of the best dogs i know

        Reply
        1. cuteusername
          August 5, 2016

          The problem lies not with the dog so much as with insurance companies perception of the dog. I can’t find an insurance company that would insure any homeowner that also owns a pit. (Rotties and Chows are up on that list too!)

          Reply
          1. Melissa Smith
            August 5, 2016

            There are some – but you will often pay just a bit more on your homeowner’s insurance. I actually did an interview with a Geico representative a couple of years ago about this and why certain dogs were on these so-called “dangerous dog” lists. What he told me actually made a lot of sense to me: Basically, dogs who have the potential to cause great harm make it on the list, regardless of their breed. He did also say that if a dog breed has a record of causing harm – i.e. verified reported issues- that breed may also make it on the list. But this is from one insurance company, so I don’t know if other companies view things differently.

            The damage potential made sense to me though because I think any dog will bite if they are scared, startled, or being tormented/harassed.

            Reply
        2. pharb
          August 11, 2016

          Yah, right. Like the pit mix about a mile from where I live that took a toddler’s lip off when the baby tripped and fell on the dog. The dog is hard-wired from generations of breeding to respond to pain with aggression. Not a bad dog, per se, but not a good choice for a busy household with small children.

          Reply
          1. Frank Sansotta
            August 12, 2016

            Yet nobody talks about the non pit bull breeds that bite. Like the golden retriever that killed an infant

            Reply
          2. Frank Sansotta
            August 12, 2016

            You seriously have no clue

            Reply
          3. al smith
            August 13, 2016

            boy are you wrong..

            Reply
      2. Justice True
        August 13, 2016

        YES! So much this! Or stupid Craigslist “breeders” who think it’s a good way to make a buck. Also poorly bred, with poor temperaments, and not given the proper start to ensure a successful home placing.

        Reply
    3. al smith
      August 13, 2016

      boy are you wrong

      Reply
  37. Matt
    February 17, 2016

    why is it ok to buy dogs when other dogs are being put down because of over population??? just because you’re not the WHOLE problem, doesn’t mean you’re not part of the problem. Do as much research into the adoptable dog and adopt instead of buying and you won’t create a market for bought animals…what is confusing about this? is your desire for a pure bred really more important than dogs’ lives? Because that is the end game, every dog that isn’t adopted will be killed as far as i know…but sure you did research so you’re good smh…so people who are overwhelmed by dogs are the problem, but those who aren’t but choose to buy rather than rescue are ok? oy vey y’all r nuts imho xo…i know i know, you’ve heard this before, but nothing you said made me feel any different about my no buying stance, only more so…and petful, really?? the only issue with buying dogs is flea markets related?? not the staggering number of animals put down each day because we don’t have enough owners who care? confused and know its an old unpopular position, and we should just let owners do what they want, but i really don’t think thats the best way to live for any of us….sorry for my tone, but you’re article is really condescending

    Reply
    1. Melissa Smith
      February 17, 2016

      Matt, I commend you for your passion about animal welfare! If there were more people like you out there, we would see a lot less animal abuse and puppy mill activity. You absolutely have the right to feel how you feel about adopting over purchasing. Many people share your view on the issue. It is overwhelming how many animals are euthanized daily. It is heartbreaking to see the stories of dogs abandoned on the side of the road, at shelters due to age or infirmity or simple activity level, and so on. If I had the money and the land, I’d adopt every dog out there!

      Some people do choose to buy from breeders, and as a person I respect their right to do so. Perhaps someday we as a country and even a world can come together and eliminate the issue of euthanized dogs because we’ll all be responsible about our pets.

      Reply
      1. Matt
        February 24, 2016

        not sure why you respect their right honestly…but really appreciate your response-i know you and almost everyone on here cares a lot, but i think we give each other passes on things really mean to dogs that don’t need to happen…thanks!

        Reply
        1. johnnyglock
          March 28, 2016

          Because it is in fact a right. Rights are respected. Ya know?

          Reply
          1. Matt
            March 28, 2016

            It is the right of people to be cruel, cold, and callous. Legally people can be that way. Doesn’t mean that I have any respect for their actions. I was just saying I think we hide behind phrase like “it’s their right” as a way not to challenge our own and others’ behaviors. Legal issues often fall behind what’s “right”. i just don’t understand someone who buys a dog rather than saving one. Just really cruel and mindless to me.

            Reply
            1. johnnyglock
              March 28, 2016

              I think we’re just trying to lead by example. Don’t make bad choices that you literally won’t want to live with. I’m so with you. I don’t understand why anyone would buy a dog that they didn’t really want and then abandon it to the pound. Just vicious behavior.

              Now buying a dog from a breeder you have thoroughly vetted (well beyond a Google search) that’s the kind of responsible thing everyone should do. It should probably be the ONLY legal way to obtain a dog frankly. In fact, maybe abandoning a dog should be the thing that’s illegal. That’s a far better solution than making smart decision making illegal.

            2. Matt
              July 11, 2016

              a smart choice is to not rescue a dog and buy one instead??? nope thats cruel, no matter how much vetting you did. we don’t live in a world where dogs need to be bred. breeding them makes no sense except to selfish humans that want a dog like they want a purse…sorry no respect for people that buy dogs at all – for any reason i can think of.

            3. johnnyglock
              July 14, 2016

              Sorry you can’t see the bigger picture.

            4. Matt
              July 18, 2016

              nothing is bigger than a dog begging for life…sorry you and so many others cant see that

            5. johnnyglock
              July 19, 2016

              Yeah we’re trying to end conditions that cause that. Anyway. Good luck.

            6. Matt
              August 11, 2016

              and in the meantime all those dogs can just be put down….cool, good luck to us all

            7. Justice True
              August 13, 2016

              Would you see the forest thru the trees?? I have saved dogs. Even hard to adopt dogs, with disabilities, or older, through photographs. I am not cold, cruel, or callous. The kind of dog I want, well just you can’t find it, but even just for a German Shepherd, a puppy will be adopted. Just because I didn’t, doesn’t mean a GSD pup will die. Or an older one. Those are highly, highly adoptable. So again, you might as well say unless you adopt a hard to place dog, you are cruel and callous. Those are the ones that need to be viewed differently. And I have helped them! So I’m horrible for having a working line dog that does a job??

            8. Matt
              August 13, 2016

              you wanted a german shepherd, and that was more important than saving a dog slated to die….only you can judge whats right or wrong…i couldn’t live with myself if i did that, but thats me…glad you’ve saved dogs, maybe you should see that as a good thing. you’re angry at me for caring about dogs enough to put aside my preferences to save one…i think your anger is misplaced – but hey keep screaming, really making yourself clear

            9. Justice True
              August 13, 2016

              Maybe? YES, it is a good thing. I’m not angry at you for that…nor am I “screaming”. It was important to have a dog that was bred to do what it is they were meant to do, a good representative of a German Shepherd, with good temperament, and health. Very specific traits. If not me, then another working home would of had him, what’s the difference? I don’t want a pit bull, and frankly, that’s what is most in need of adopters.

    2. Kuvasz Breeder of Merit
      February 24, 2016

      So why are breeders blamed for the millions of mixed breeds that are in shelters, the vast majority pit bulls and mixes? Why not do something that really helps and stem that tide.

      Reply
      1. Matt
        February 24, 2016

        i agree but isn’t it a yes/and issue? like yes it needs to be stemmed, and while the situation exists, shouldn’t we be more compassionate to dogs being slaughtered? also, I’m a hot head and new to the dog game. so i apologize to anyone who read my comment and was offended (honestly didn’t think anyone would read it), but i do think its an act of cruelty to choose to support generally inhumane breeding when dogs are being put down…and i don’t think the legal right of someone to do it passes my personal ethics test…but who am i? I’m just saying…

        Reply
        1. Kuvasz Breeder of Merit
          February 24, 2016

          The act of cruelty was allowing mixed breeds to profligate in the first place. If everyone bought from good breeders who offer written contracts and lifetime right of first refusal should the owner not be able to take the dog back, then the only rescue dogs would be the thousands upon thousands that are being imported into this country. My pure bred have actually stopped acts of cruelty. They’ve run bears and other predators back into the woods and out of civilization where they would have been killed or they would have damaged peoples innocent pet. There’s not a dog in the shelter in my local area that can do the job I need to be done by my dogs. And no in 25 years of owning this breed not a single one of them has been hurt but they have saved countless lives. Human an animal. People get so focused on the poor dogs dying and shoulders they don’t realize the trickle down effect. Is good dogs are bred by good breeders, then all we’re going to have left or poorly bread mix breeds that are probably the offspring of strays or people that can’t provide good prenatal and postnatal care of the puppies. A healthy well it just a dog that can do the work that they were bred for centuries to do is a thing of beauty and it makes me sad that the anti breeders are so narrow minded that all they can see is the trees and not the forest.

          Reply
          1. Matt
            February 24, 2016

            ohhhhhhhhhhhh so you’re against the crossing of breeds…ummmmm thats insane and doubly insane given that interbreeding can alleviate many medical concerns that bure bred dogs are more susceptible to. AND that just isn’t the world we live in, dogs are interbred and they need our help. You choose to devalue the life of non pure bred dogs, so its an easy choice for you, but your ideal world of only pure bred dogs will never occur, nor do i feel it should. SO, in th real world, i think its cruel to place value of life over the beautiful amazing dogs we have in the world, and your views are simply inhumane and cruel imho. Which is not terribly shocking coming from someone who makes a living selling pure breeds, but ill leave that there-i have no money to gain here, just caring about dogs.

            Reply
            1. Kuvasz Breeder of Merit
              February 25, 2016

              Oh sure. Mixed breeds are healthier. That bit of fantasy is why there are so many unwanted dogs in the world! Hey my mixed bred is healthier, let’s breed her!! And completely unsubstantiated by anything but the anti-breeder drivel you brainwash yourself with. So I guess you are an advocate of the rampant mixed “breeding” that is going on? You think pit bull mixes and doodle anything are preferable to breeds that have been preserved through history? Well, guess what fills the shelters!! Thank you for adding to the problem by advocating for mixed breed production.

              I got into purebreds because the mixed breeds I had growing up were a mess. Allergic to fleas..in Texas? And the black rescue dog that bit children? No thanks.

              And uh, make my living? Another good one. Yet more tired tripe from someone who condones and supports the unfettered breeding of unwanted mixed breeds. You people are so predictable. You can’t win the argument with facts and courtesy, you have to resort to personal insults and slurs. Real adult.

              Instead of sitting on your assistance whining about dogs in shelters dying,.go do something about it. Educate the public, donate to spay/neuter clinics, make sure your local shelters do no sell any rescues without spaying and neutering. Oh, but that’s ok, they are mixed breeds and should be the ones reproducing.

              Don’t let your mutts have mutts!

            2. Jason Ritzema
              March 6, 2016

              Rescues with large profit margins?

              In order to be tax exempt, they must be a non profit. Who are these rescues with millions in profits? I’ll be sure to stay away from them.

              Here in Chicago, rescues are going over budget trying to help dogs with the canine flu, etc. I am a foster parent for PAWS Chicago, I know they have gone $300k over budget treating dogs from the city pound that had the flu.

              What’s your beef with shelter dogs and mutts? Most are great dogs. I have a purebred I bought from a breeder, as well as resues. The pure bred is no better behaved or healtheir than my mutts, I love them all the same. Knowing what I know now, I’ll never buy another dog from a breeder again. I can’t in good consciousness buy a dog when other dogs are being put down in shelters. The breeders aren’t going to put their dogs down, so I guess by not buying from them no lives are lost.

              I will say that my dogs are strictly for companion purposes. If I was going to say there was any occasion where someone should get a dog from a breeder – perhaps only those who plan on having a working dog, like a hunting dog or a German Shepard police dog. But even some of the working dog breeds have changed so much over the last 100 years that they aren’t even suited for doing the work they used to be bred for. The saint bernard is a god example. Unforntaltely I think more breeders are about $ than anything else.

            3. Kuvasz Breeder of Merit
              March 6, 2016

              All you have to is Google “retail rescue”
              Ethical breeders are as pissed off about bad breeders as anyone. Bad breeders already ignore laws so the good breeders, who actually are probably in deep personal debt because they breed for the love of the breed and do all the health screening etc, are the ones that get damaged the most until they just give up. The public deserves good well bred dogs that have proper genetic health screenings, and proper pre and post natal care but with this adopt don’t shop, it’s causing a flood of poorly bred rescue imposters flooding across state and national lines. And the rescue organizations not only charge high fees they solicit donations for the “poor homeless dogs”. Many rescues breed their own pups since they generally charge higher prices and help pay wages. Some rescues farm out the homeless dogs into foster homes and therefore don’t have housing expenses. They sell pups without them being spayed and neutered. There’s a LOT of bad breeding going on but people such as yourself would rather blame breeders than see and admit what is really causing dogs to be in the rescue system.

              http://animallaw.foxrothschild.com/2014/05/20/the-phenomenon-called-retail-rescue/

            4. Jason Ritzema
              March 9, 2016

              I’m sure there are going to be bad examples in both the breeding and rescue world.

              I follow the Chicago Animal Care and Control (volunteers page) on Facebook. This is a high kill shelter that takes in strays, owner surrenders, and abuse/neglect cases. There are many Animal Rescues in the area that pull dogs from this shelter. I see the “freedom photos” of the dogs leaving the shelter and can even check out these rescues websites later on and see the dogs they pulled.

              Many rescues, as you put it – “farm out” the dogs into foster homes, yes. This is because a lot of them do not have the funds for a facility, or if they do, the cages at the facility are full.

              I foster for Paws Chicago. I know that they pull animals from the local kill shelter, take some owner surrenders (if they pass the evaluation), and also import some dogs from other states. While I would rather see them pull all the dogs from local kill shelters, I understand that pit bulls make up a huge majority of the dogs at the Chicago shelter, and not everybody in the area (with a lot of the population living in rentals) are allowed to have a dog of this size or breed due to landlord restrictions. I think this is partially why only 45% or so of pitbulls make it out of that shelter alive while over 80% of chihuahuas do (these two breeds are the most common).

              My current foster dog was a transfer that came from a high kill shelter in Oklahoma. He was 2 years old and intact. Since they got him in September of last year, they have gotten him up to date on shots, neutered, dental cleaning, and provided food and Revolution for fleas/ticks/heart-worms. The dog also tested positive for heart-worms when they got him in, so they have been treating him for that as well.

              When he is cleared for adoption, we will pay $200 + a $75 refundable deposit if we complete obedience classes. I have a feeling they have a lot more than $200/$275 invested into saving this dogs life.

              Not all rescues charge ridiculous adoption fees and make the huge profits you speak of. I also think that by them “farming” him out to live with us, he is in a much better place and it opens up space for them to save another animal.

              As far as rescues breeding their own puppies – these aren’t rescues, these are back yard breeders pretending to be rescues. I have also fostered a puppy in the past. They took in a pregnant dog that had been a stray – they didn’t breed the dog. After the puppies were adopted, they now have the mother spayed and available for adoption.

              I guess it’s all up to the person looking for a dog to do the right research.

    3. Heather Staas
      August 13, 2016

      GOOD breeders are part of the SOLUTION, not the enemy. They screen and educate buyers, they support owners for the life of the dog, they health and temperament test all breeding stock, and many of them also do rescue/foster work as well. They make sure SOUND, HEALTHY, PREDICTABLE pet dogs get into the RIGHT hands and then provide the support and information necessary to help that family do the best job they can. All of this effort and dedication keeps dogs out of shelters and in their own homes and prevents puppies from ending up in the wrong places or bred indiscriminately.

      Reply
  38. Frank Sansotta
    February 18, 2016

    If you feel the need to purchase a pure bred dog from a breeder, you’re not a dog person. What you’re looking for is a fashion accessory, not a pet or new member of the family. If you’re not part of the solution, you’re part of the problem that exists in shelter overpopulation.

    Reply
    1. Kuvasz Breeder of Merit
      February 24, 2016

      If I wanted to adopt a dog right now in my local community, my only choice is a pit bull mix. I’ll pass. I’m sure they can be great dogs but I like coated dogs for my winters. And frankly, I don’t want the liability.

      Purebreds are seldom in shelters and usually get place fast. There’s such a shortage rescues are importing sick purebred from third world countries by the thousands. They are turning into puppy brokers (and tax free to boot)

      Reply
      1. Matt
        February 24, 2016

        yeah that feels like an accessory then to me personally…innit? not evil, but less than caring, when those less “desirable” dogs are gonna probably die…and you want one!! no offense just really confuses me…or wait for the dog u want from a shelter…i did a long time for my first and it was well worth it!

        Reply
      2. Frank Sansotta
        February 25, 2016

        You do realize that there are breed specific rescues out there, right? And next time, before you put your two cents in, make sure you have two cents first…

        Reply
        1. Valiexi
          May 26, 2016

          When I was helping my mom find a new dog (She wanted a small breed), breed-specific rescues were hardly any help. For the more desirable breeds, options are still going to be extremely limited — often what you’ll find are much older dogs with questionable history and possible temperament problems. She found one Shih Tzu from a breed rescue, but was warned by its foster family that it had serious behavioral issues.

          She ended up buying a Havanese puppy for $800 from a family whose dogs had produced a litter, and she has not regretted it one single day.

          The truth is, if it’s a desirable breed and reasonably young, it’s going to get snatched up fast whether it’s at a shelter or rescue….unless it has serious problems. And “desirable” dogs are fast becoming “Any dog that isn’t a pit bull or Chihuahua.”

          Reply
        2. pharb
          August 11, 2016

          My breed-specific rescue almost never has dogs available. Why? Because almost everyone who breeds my (rare) small, low-shedding terrier takes great care to raise healthy pups from healthy parents. We carefully screen our buyers to make sure it’s a good fit between owner and dog. We make little or no profit off our puppies, who are raised with care and love in our homes.Our dogs do not NEED to be rescued, because they are happy members of their homes. The only dogs I know of who have gone through our breed rescue have been from a pond-scum puppy miller in Missouri. You don’t know what you are talking about with your blanket pronunciations, and your attitude is offensive. It’s great that you are doing rescue work, but I suspect that part of your motivation is that it makes you feel superior to others.

          Reply
          1. Frank Sansotta
            August 12, 2016

            No, just superior to the closed minded, like yourself. Do you realize you contradicted yourself in your angry little rant? Actually, all of your rants, are just that. I read some of your posts and they’re all angry. I’m not the one with the grandiose attitude, you are, which is pathetic because you haven’t a clue. I spend time at the shelters with the unwanted, I’ve been on rescue missions that were life threatening, I’ve held a neglected/abused dog in my arms as they were dying…..Have you? Probably not….. Bye Felicia

            Reply
    2. Matt
      February 24, 2016

      amen

      Reply
    3. johnnyglock
      March 28, 2016

      It just means you want an awesome dog who isn’t going to have health issues. You know this because you research the breeder you’re buying from. Because you don’t want to support puppy mills. Because you are a thoughtful responsible person. If you were like that there’d be no issues of overcrowding. What a dope.

      Reply
      1. Frank Sansotta
        March 28, 2016

        You think buying from a breeder guarantees health and temperament? Lol. It would be great if life were that simple

        Reply
        1. johnnyglock
          March 28, 2016

          Yes. Yes I do. Because I don’t trust anyone, I do my research. And then I get what I am looking for. Life really is that simple.

          Reply
          1. Frank Sansotta
            March 28, 2016

            Yeah, ok

            Reply
            1. johnnyglock
              March 29, 2016

              Sounds good Papa

      2. Jen jen
        July 11, 2016

        agree completely

        Reply
      3. Matt
        August 5, 2016

        shelter dogs dont have more health issues-please cite your research and not just your opinion…i know many pure breeds with health issues, gimme a break. there are tons of nasty stereotypes that are not being challenged on this thread. people really get defensive when you point out their choices cause pain

        Reply
    4. Avalon
      May 3, 2016

      I worked as a comanager for a funded animal shelter, and I completely disagree with your above statement.

      At least with breeder, you have a better understanding of what you are adopting. I’ve seen too many Looney, unstable, I’ll dogs come in and out of my shelter.

      With every dog breed, there are specific personality traits (ie: neapolitans are like Shadows and will follow you everywhere; Great Danes are known for their separation anxiety; Border Collies are known for their level of high intelligence and herding capabilities; Boxers are high energy; While many other breeds are further independent; ect…)

      I would never recommend mixing dog breeds. Too many genetic malfunctions can go awry.. Mentally, physically, and emotionally.. I know that there are some amazing muts out there, and every dog has a beautiful quality about them.. Every dog deserves to be loved..

      However, I can completely understand why a person would rather purchase there puppy from a well-rounded purebred breeder.

      Reply
      1. Matt
        July 11, 2016

        no thats just cruel. buying a dog when one is being out to death next to it is CRUEL. no way around it. it is cruel…we can talk about why so many dogs are up for adoption if you like sometime, but the fact of the matter is that they ARE. They are in danger, and NEED to be rescued and YOU and other people don’t give a hoot (nice use of hoot matt?) because you’ve convinced yourself that your needs to get EXACTLY the dog YOU THINK you want is more important than a beautiful dog staying alive. DOGS SHOULD NOT BE SOLD ANY MORE THAN HUMANS SHOULD imnho. Life respects life, and animals should have the same respect.

        Reply
    5. Justice True
      August 13, 2016

      BS. This brainwashed crap is just BS. My dog is not a fashion accessory. He helps me with my disability, and he is my partner in dog sports. I’m part of the solution, because I endured all the challenges of a difficult dog, and learned to handle him, and am keeping him.

      Reply
      1. Frank Sansotta
        August 13, 2016

        Um, yeah ok

        Reply
  39. Melissa Smith
    February 25, 2016

    Some great discussion from both sides of the issue! Please remember to be respectful of fellow posters, and make your points without attacking the other person.

    Reply
    1. Matt
      August 13, 2016

      any way we can moderate some of the vitriol on this page or shut it down? don’t really feel like being cursed at for my opinion, and don’t think anyone should be…

      Reply
      1. Matt
        August 13, 2016

        good discussion for parts, but cursing and name calling is really just not cool imho

        Reply
      2. Melissa Smith
        August 13, 2016

        Matt, I apologize. I have been working all day and unable to check my e-mails until now. You are correct, there should be no trolling nor should there be cursing. We are all adults here.

        Reply
  40. Gina
    February 26, 2016

    I feel like I’m going to get my head bitten off for even asking such a question, so allow me to preface it by stating that I am in no way advocating for the procurement of dogs from breeders, nor am I advocating solely for rescuing dogs from shelters. While I absolutely want to see less dogs in peril, I am a neutral, equal-opportunity, albeit non-owning dog lover who has dedicated a plethora of money and time to local animal shelters over the years (as I am in no place to have one of my own.) I have never turned a blind eye at a stray and have even placed myself in dangerous situations just to ensure that they are not. That said, I truly hope that everyone sees that what I am about to say is STRICTLY coming from an inquisitive perspective, and not AT ALL from a place of refutation.

    I am entirely aware of how supply and demand works. The less puppies are in demand from breeders means that less puppies will be supplied by breeders. Unfortunately though, even if the work of breeders were to be outlawed, there would still be people who wanted purebreds; there would still be people who would sell and purchase puppies illegally because it’s the world we live in. There are no absolutes.

    So what about those puppies who are bred and do not get picked? Bred puppies who are unwanted can also end up becoming shelter dogs too, right? I mean, of course, not all of them- I’m not delusional. But I’ve seen plenty of our furry-friends on rescue sites who came from breeders. So as a lover of all animals, I have to ask: don’t they deserve love, too? In reading the article above, it broke my heart to hear that somebody wouldn’t touch her “breeder-bought dog with a 10-foot pole.” And again, that’s not me siding with the owner/purchaser of the puppy, but it’s me feeling awful for the puppy, itself! It’s not the puppy’s fault it was born strictly out of a breeding process. Is that the mentality that people have now-a-days regarding purebred pups? If so, can we call ourselves dog-lovers if they are exempt?

    Again, I am not taking sides with anyone so I truly hope that I do not receive hateful responses. I am sincerely asking this question on an inquisitive/educational basis, as it just popped into my head.

    Reply
    1. Melissa Smith
      February 27, 2016

      Gina, I applaud your well-stated comment! Your question is entirely valid, and you are correct in that there are no absolutes.

      Reply
    2. Heather Staas
      August 13, 2016

      You can solve this hypothetical problem by choosing your breeder carefully. A good breeder never has an unsold, unhomed, unwanted puppy. They stay in touch and support buyers for the life of the dog. They health test and screen buyers, and they don’t breed more puppies than they have waiting lists for. They microchip puppies so they NEVER end up in a shelter, assuming the shelter actually scans and contacts them (some deliberately do not).

      Reply
      1. Heather Staas
        August 13, 2016

        …and ZERO reputable breeders sell to pet shops or third party, EVER. No matter what they try to tell you to sell a pup.

        Reply
        1. al smith
          August 13, 2016

          boy are you wrong

          Reply
          1. Heather Staas
            August 13, 2016

            If you believe that, then you don’t know what a reputable breeder is and we need more serious education about what people should look for and what they should expect. NO REPUTABLE BREEDER sells to pet stores.

            Reply
            1. Alex
              August 13, 2016

              I have a very rare Black Russian Terrier. Boy are you so right when it comes to finding an ethical, responsible breeder. It took me two years to wait for my girl. I had to be screened, fill out applications, references, etc. I had to have experience with giant, powerful breeds. I had to ensure that Eulalie would be fed raw, taken to training classes, seen by an excellent vet, etc. I had to sign a legal contract, I had to sign a spay contract, and have all paperwork completed. If I can’t care for her, she goes back to my breeder. If she becomes ill from a genetic disease, my breeder will take care of it. If she is diagnosed with hip/elbow dysplasia before 2 my breeder will take care of it. Eulalie’s sire and dam have excellent scores on the OFA website, CHIC numbers, have excellent personalities and temperaments, and every dog in her lineage has either a championship and/or grand championship. My breeder is very particular on who she sells to. I had to drive 7 hours to pick Eulalie up. She came with a microchip and I had to have her seen by my vet within 24 hours. I still talk to my breeder no less than once a week. Eulalie is a Canine Good Citizen, training to be a Certified Therapy Dog, and is training to compete in agility. Responsible, ethical breeders exist!

  41. Eru Illivater
    February 27, 2016

    Interesting article!

    I have personally rescued all of my dogs (and cats), whether it was from going to the local pound or, in one case, finding one wandering in a parking lot. I am a huge advocate for rescuing dogs and cats, even though I think many aspects of the adoption process could be improved to help promote it. This being said, I DON’T have a problem with breeders. And by breeders, I refer to someone who breeds for top quality (so not your average backyard breeder). Their dogs exhibit the best characteristics of their breed, including conformation, ability, temperament, etc.
    As someone who works with animals for a living (horse trainer), it is very common to see a lot of pure bred dogs hanging around barns and show grounds. And it’s usually, but certainly not limited to, terriers, such as a Jack Russell and other high energy dogs such as German Shepherds, Poodles, Border Collies, different types of hounds (and commonly Corgis). In fact, my current dog (rescue), is a Jack Russell! There are certain breeds of dogs that are very good around livestock, people, and make great working dogs on top of it all; and the reason a lot of these people go to breeders rather than a shelter, is because they want to know their dog’s performance bloodlines, health history in the lineage, and they want to ensure that they are getting the best possible dog for the tasks they will be asking of it.
    I specifically chose my jack russell, not only due to her great personality, but also because I know how great they are around the horses, they are intelligent, independent, and honestly, she was a lucky find. Of course, I am not suggesting, that shelter dogs are not capable of being performance animals (since mine is a pound puppy anyway), but with a reputable breeder, you have more of a guarantee of what your dog will look and behave like and any future health concerns. For someone who is looking for a high performance animal or a working dog, will more than likely go to a breeder. For someone who wants a very specific type of dog, will more than likely go to a breeder. If they can afford the dog and can give it a great home, then who am I to open my mouth and tell them to rescue instead? If you have a good eye at a shelter, you can find a great dog, and I have been very fortunate in that respect.

    Also…I spent about $150 adopting my current dog with no health history. A month later I had to rush her to the emergency vet because she has a stomach problem I didn’t know about. That bill was around $800. So for the sake of argument, I could have spent almost $1000 on a selectively bred dog, and yes, anything can happen, but the likelihood I’d be running to the vet when it’s 6 months is more unlikely. Truth be told, I’ve spent more on my rescues, between unknown ailments, kennel cough medicine, spaying, worms, and 2x daily urinary incontinence prescription, than my friends who went to a breeder and picked out their puppy. Something to take into consideration.

    Reply
    1. Melissa Smith
      February 28, 2016

      All excellent points, Eru! I loved your comment, thank you! Ironically, my dog was a rescue too. (She’s passed) She was a purebred German shepherd — but she did have a lot of medical issues, the largest of which being hip problems and myasthenia gravis. (Rare but slightly more common in sheppies) It would have been good to know as a pet parent going into her rescue that her family history had this disease as manifested. I still would have rescued her! But I would have been more prepared for almost $10,000 in vet bills when all was said and done.

      Reply
      1. Eru Illivater
        February 28, 2016

        Isn’t that the truth! My parents own two of the sweetest, rescued Pit Bull Terriers (can you say couch potatoes?), and unfortunately one of them has had to have surgery on both of her hind legs. I believe both dogs are around 5 years old now and the surgeries took place about a year ago. 4 years old and TWO surgeries on her hind legs due to purely genetics?! Just like you, my parents did what they had to do to keep their dog happy and comfortable, of course. I only have an idea of what the vet bill looked like and it makes me weak at the knees.
        I think it’s easy to assume that everyone cares for their animals to the same extent that we do. That no matter what happens, our pets will always have a roof over their head, a loving family, and someone to pay for their health care, no matter what the cost. Unfortunately, I think one of the problems with any type of animal rescues is that a lot of people go in blind and with high expectations for their animals. They might even factor in the cost of living and food and basic vet fees, but when their pet turns up with a serious health scare or even the need for daily medication (which is, frankly, more common than people think), they aren’t willing to treat it. How many older, previously owned pets do you see at shelters? A lot. Most with health issues or with behavioural problems that COULD have been prevented with proper socialization and training.
        On the flip side, a REPUTABLE dog breeder is less likely to sell to inexperienced dog owners, especially dogs that are highly driven and active. I am in the process of potentially receiving a young German Shepherd from a family who purchased the dog as a puppy from an idiot breeder (IMO) and are looking to rehome it. You know, because it just got too big and nips at the kids and acts like a typical, untrained GS. I’m hoping the dog gets along with current dog (ie no animal aggression) or I can’t take it since I’m around other animals all day. It’s unfortunate but that’s usually how purebred dogs end up in shelters. The people buying them are idiots, but the person selling to them is even more at fault for thinking a German Shepherd puppy would thrive with young kids and owners the romanticise everything.
        I could rant all day, but I suppose the point is, we can find the good, the bad, and the ugly on both sides. Well informed people tend to make well informed decisions. If adopting a dog makes sense for you and your family, by all means do it! There are so many dogs that need great homes. But if you rather have a purebred dog and meet the parents and all that jazz, don’t let people get to you, because at the end of the day, you’ll probably spend the same amount of money.

        Reply
        1. Melissa Smith
          February 29, 2016

          I have to admit my first reaction was OMG A GSD — I would so take him! Lol!
          But then, I have GSD experience, so for me it wouldn’t be walking in blind like so many people do.

          You’re very right in that even when people factor in the basic cost of pet care, they don’t always plan for the emergencies. I know I didn’t and I learned a hard lesson with my girl. Now when I do adopt another GSD, I will be ready to handle all types of medical care that he or she might need.

          Reply
  42. Frank Sansotta
    February 29, 2016

    In my opinion breeding should be illegal until the shelter population becomes managable. No need for “designer dogs” while shelter dogs die. Just my 2 cents

    Reply
    1. Kuvasz Breeder of Merit
      February 29, 2016

      So then the puppy crazed public will just demand more imported “rescue” dogs like the “poor homeless street goldens” from Turkey that are now being reported as stolen.

      I just find it fascinating so many people blindly believe that breeders actually cause shelter overpopulation. Maybe pit bull breeders, but in my breed, breeders and the breed rescue alike have waiting lists. It’s a very ancient historic breed that provides many useful functions, and in no way could be considered designer.

      If breeding is illegal, then people have to get their dogs from somewhere. Thousands upon thousands of aick, sometimes stolen rescue dogs are brought into this country to feed the need. There is NO oversight or quality control on “rescues”. Your tax dollars may be going to your local shelter to pay for them to import dogs across state lines and resell.

      Reply
      1. Frank Sansotta
        March 1, 2016

        Please enlighten me on the importing of dogs from third world nations. I have never heard of such a thing and neither has anyone I brought the subject up with. They all look at me like I have three heads when I mention it. What country are we talking about? The U.S.? It’s all news to me and everyone I’ve mentioned it to. It even baffled Google. Sounds to me like another concocted story made up by a breeder to justify their “importance” in the dog world. Bottom line is simply this, if you really want a dog and there were no breeders, you’d only have one option……. Rescue. If you choose to not get a dog because you can’t get your designer dog, or canine fashion accessory, then you’re not a dog person. A dog person doesn’t care about breed, only the companionship and joy a “shelter mutt”, (as breeders will call them) will bring into their life. Debating that would just solidify my point.

        Reply
        1. mamanas01
          June 12, 2016

          Well I think you have been hiding out. There have been many reports on national reliable outlets about this growing problem. Maybe get someone who knows how to do research .

          Reply
          1. Frank Sansotta
            June 12, 2016

            I have and that’s where I got my info. I’m not one of those people that believe everything I read on the Internet. Get your info from a reliable source before you try to make yourself seem well versed

            Reply
        2. Justice True
          August 13, 2016

          FU with this not a dog person. YOU are not a dog person. A dog person is one who knows their breed, works them, trains them, fulfills their needs. Not a designer dog, not a fashion accessory. So black and white, aren’t you? Beautiful is what serves a useful purpose Max von Stephanitz….

          Reply
    2. Chloe
      March 26, 2016

      Umm, you know, theres somethings called personality, conformation, size and behaviours that are controlled with purebred dogs.
      For example, Mastiffs tend to be lower energy
      Cavalier King Charles spaniels are usually medium energy, reasonably easy to train, and are generally good first dogs.
      Border collies are high energy, highly trainable dogs that excel in dog sports with high exercise and mental stimulation requirements which can lead to destructive behaviours.

      “Designer dogs” ironically are mixed breeds. Such as the “Cavapoo” (cavalier x poodle)
      So… you are funny!

      In shelters, you do not know very much at all about the dogs. First, there is little choice with breed. Second, you dont know potential health or behavioural problems that may occur in the future. Theres only so much you can tell in a shelter.

      Yes, it is extremely sad that shelter dogs die, but the problem is not breeders or buying from breeders, its people who are not a responsible breeders having dogs which they abandon, send to shelters, or do not spay/neuter.

      Responsible breeders will only give dogs to people able to look after them. For example, a responsible Malinois breeder will not sell a puppy to someone who is going to walk it 10 mins a day and provide it with no mental stimulation.
      This means the potential owner will be less likely to end up with a dog which they cannot look after and they have to send to a shelter because it is destroying the house.

      Also, if people who weren’t responsible breeders all spayed their dogs, the world would be filled with much less problems. We dont need dogs with bad health, bad temperament and overall bad breeding being born.
      If there were no breeders, there would be no responsible breeders that breed healthy dogs with good temperaments and only provide them to suitable owners.
      Imagine if only unspayed dogs with accidental litters were born. There would be no health tests, no more breeds (unpredictable personalities with potentially ill suited owners), bad conformation, etc.

      Reply
    3. Valiexi
      May 26, 2016

      Honestly, the shelter population is never going to become manageable until the pit bull problem is resolved, possibly via mandatory sterilization. Pit bulls are flooding shelters coast to coast, and I think I read something like 1 million are euthanized every year. There simply aren’t enough people willing to adopt them.

      Reply
      1. Melissa Smith
        May 26, 2016

        It’s really too bad because pit bulls can be amazing dogs. They get such a bad blanket rep because of the way humans use them as fighting dogs.

        Reply
        1. Valiexi
          May 26, 2016

          They can be amazing dogs, but the fact still remains that they kill, maim, and mutilate more people (and pets) than all other breeds combined. I think people need to be aware of this fact before they make a decision on which dog to adopt, and pit bull owners also need to be vigilant.

          Reply
  43. Chris
    March 7, 2016

    The truth of the matter is, as long as there are people to adopt poorly bred dogs and who support bad breeders, the issues will remain. I feel terrible for dogs that need a home. However, we need more responsible breeders, not less. We also need responsible, educated puppy buyers. We need for people to STOP buying pets from people who have no business breeding puppies from dogs who have no business being bred. If anyone thinks responsible breeders are in any way contributing to the problem, they really are short-sighted. The problem is that the majority of society doesn’t want to pay for a well bred pup so they throw a couple hundred bucks at a backyard breeder. When that pup gets diagnosed with whatever genetic disease that was passed down to it from its poorly bred parents, they weigh their options and well, they only invested a couple hundred bucks so let’s take it to the shelter and it can be someone else’s problem This happens every day. So, some people are proposing that it’s more important for this dog to be adopted than it is for a family to choose a healthy puppy bred by a responsible breeder. Those people are saying the family is selfish to want that good experience for their family and if you can’t afford a $10,000 vet bill for a rescue dog and the heartache that goes with it, a family doesn’t deserve to adopt a dog? I love dogs but at what point did we put animals as an object of worship? They are so much more important than humans now? Our world is so messed up in so many ways and people who think this way are creating the problem, not solving it. Stop buying puppies from bad breeders just because they are cheap. That’s the issue. If they can’t find buyers, they are done for and the flow of dogs into the shelters stops. For everyone else ranting about adopting a puppy from a reputable breeder…really? Please focus your energy on educating the public on the importance of only adopting from highly reputable breeders. Then, we can all own wonderfully bred, healthy dogs and the shelters are out of business. Keep up what you are doing now and all we’ll have are homeless dogs running the streets and no pet industry at all. Travel to an island like St. Lucia and you’ll see what it would look like. The people there have never heard of a dog groomer. Is that what you want for our country? Dogs are a part of our heritage and our families. Don’t misplace your efforts and rob our country and it’s people of this freedom to own a well bred puppy and don’t put off hate onto good breeders who feel the same about shelters and are actually on your side. The fight is to stop the purchase of puppies from bad breeders, period. Cut off the head of the monster and watch it die.

    Reply
    1. ouinaturals
      August 11, 2016

      That’s only part of the issue. The other issue is irresponsible pet owners.

      Reply
    2. Matt
      August 11, 2016

      and what do we do with the million plus dogs scheduled to die this year? yes stop the “problem” overall, but thats not happening anytime soon, so in the mean time shouldn’t responsible dog owners save a dogs life? what could be more responsible?

      Reply
      1. pharb
        August 11, 2016

        Where, exactly, do you think the purpose-bred dogs of the future are going to come from? If someone needs a dog bred for police work, or guide work, or a non-shedding companion for the elderly? How about for herding? A breed bred for generations to be RELIABLY gentle with children? Do you think that all those genes are just going to float in suspension until all the Lab-Pit-Rottie-Chow-Golden Doodle mixes have stopped reproducing?You want to adopt a pit mix from the shelter, and you can give it a good home, GREAT. Just mind your own business when it comes to other peoples’ responsible choices.

        Reply
        1. Frank Sansotta
          August 13, 2016

          Someone needs to go back on their meds

          Reply
          1. Alex
            August 13, 2016

            You can not tell me that a mixed-breed dog is better at police/military work in Siberia than a Black Russian Terrier. You can not tell me that a mixed-breed dog is better at jumping out of a helicopter and rescuing people at sea than a Newfoundland. You can not tell me that a mixed-breed dog is better at pack hunting a lion than a Rhodesian Ridgeback. The list can and will go on and on and on. Breeds were created and have become a particular standard for a particular reason. Every pure bred dog was created for a particular purpose. Responsible, ethical breeders exist for the betterment and continuation of pure bred dogs. It’s ridiculous when people say that mixed-breed dogs can do anything a pure-bred dog can. Maybe a couple, or a few mixed-breeds can. But not all of them. Their is a reason why pure bred dogs exist. They’re not “designer” dogs or “fashion” statements that some have so wrongly and ignorantly posted. They have a purpose and have been bred to a particular individual breed standards for years and years and years.

            Reply
  44. Maddie
    March 16, 2016

    I don’t think purebred dogs are “designer dogs”. I am currently considering purchasing a pup from responsible breeders. Not because I want an “accessory” but because I want a good family pet for my two disabled children. I have tried 2 times adopting dogs from my local shelter. Our first, a cute hound dog seemed to be the perfect pup. He passed away in a month after we had completely fallen in love with him. Second, a German Shepherd who was very violent and bit both of my children. Luckily, nothing drastic happened. My children were not able to defend themselves and I could not put them in such danger. They both love dogs very much and I do not want them to fear dogs forever so I consider buying a pup that is responsibly bred. I don’t care what people think, I will buy a pup that I know everything about rather than a dog that I fear around the house.

    Reply
    1. Melissa Smith
      March 17, 2016

      Maddie, this is great input and your reasons for wanting a dog that has a solid and verifiable history are very sound. Thank you for your comment! <3

      Reply
  45. Josie
    May 18, 2016

    I cannot express how much I loved reading this article.
    I am all for rescuing a pet from a shelter and/or rescue group. I currently have 2 rescue dogs (husky mix and hound mix) and 2 rescue cats. A few months ago, I decided that I really would love to add another dog to my home but this time I decided I wanted another husky. So off I went looking at husky rescue sites and also Petfinder to find my next loveable dog. I had a hard time finding a husky that was good with cats, so I decided that I needed to find a puppy so it could grow up with my kitties. I found quite a few of husky mix puppies I was interested in adopting. I reviewed over applications, spoke with people from the agencies, and found out that I had a hard time adopting a Husky puppy.
    I know Siberian Huskies have a reputation for certain qualities, but those are something I am willing to take on. I was told that they would not adopt a puppy to me, since I would not install a Hot Wire Fence to ensure the dog would not be able to escape … I was told No because I was an out of state adopter (I was more than willing to drive to pick up) … I was told No because they would need to meet me face to face (what happened to skype, references, emails) … I was told No because they were not able to do a home visit (I hate this requirement anyway as I feel it is a evasion of privacy) … I was told No due to not having a fence that met their standards … I said No Thank You due to high adoption fees (some were as high as $500.00 and didn’t include shots/spay/neutering) … After a couple months, I really felt discouraged.
    What does it take to adopt a puppy? I am a responsible pet owner. I take care of them. I love them. Instead these agencies made me feel singled out and imply that I was not “good enough” to adopt one of their puppies. They had weird requirements that did not fit my lifestyle or what I think is a good way to raise a dog. I am not going to install a hot wire fence. I refuse to shock my pet. I am happy to live my life accordingly to having pets but does that mean I have to change my whole life to adopt an animal. Do I really need to fill out a 5-page application that includes a thumb scan? Do I need to buy a new house that meets their standards? A new fence to accommodate their choosing? I wasn’t just discouraged. I felt insulted, angry, and disappointment. Why? Because I choose to adopt.
    Rescuing for Profit? During my search to adopt a husky, one thing got me thinking … Adoption Fees. Breeders always have the bad reputation for making money, but what are these adoption agencies doing? Are they making a profit and taking the glory by saying they rescue animals? A local agency near me that I encountered during my search was charging $500 (not including shots and/or sterilization) and at one point had 14 puppies up for adoption. That would total $7,000 in adoption fees. Where is the adoption fee going to? To someone’s pocket? It leaves me to wonder … hmmm!
    After discussing with my husband, we both decided to look at a breeder. We found one that was only an hour away from where we live and put our deposit down on an upcoming litter. We are currently anxiously waiting for our new little pup to be born and also get the first pick of male. I didn’t have to do tricks. I didn’t have to jump through hoops. I do not feel ashamed for our decision.
    After all, I looked at rescuing but was told NO! I was turned away!

    Reply
    1. Melissa Smith
      May 19, 2016

      Hi Josie! I think you make some really good points here. I too would love to adopt another German Shepherd, but I am always told no because I do not have a fenced in yard. It actually makes me sad to think that there are dogs that I could give a loving home to and take care of the way that they need – but because of one thing these dogs remain forever in foster homes.

      Reply
      1. Mary Beth Lane
        August 11, 2016

        There are rescue groups who do not have fence requirements. I was once told I couldn’t adopt because I didn’t have a fence. My reply was simply- you think it is better for a dog to be in a house where they can open the door, let the dog out, leave it out for 10 minutes a couple of times a day vs going for a 10 minute walk with the owner 3-4 times a day? They reconsidered. I hope you can still rescue a shepherd, they are a special breed!

        Reply
        1. Melissa Smith
          August 11, 2016

          Thank you, I will definitely look into that! <3

          Reply
  46. Angie
    June 6, 2016

    Thank you for writing this article. I am currently a proud owner of a senior rescue dog AND an adopted adult dog from a “proper” breeder (opposed to puppy mill and backyard breeders) – both of which are purebred rare Portuguese Podengos. Previous to these two dogs, I have adopted every single one of my dogs, or rescued them myself, and I have also raised carefully bred (mixed breed) dogs meant for work.

    On personal experience – I thought I was adopting an old mutt when I got Deer. She was 13 and in not so great shape. She is a classic happy ending shelter story, and is now 15, happier and in better shape than ever. But to give her companionship and a refreshing energy for both of us, we decided to adopt another dog.

    At first, I stalked rescues and adoption pages for almost a year looking for the right dog. This process was very meticulous – it had to be the opposite sex and similar in energy for Deer, first and foremost. We met several potential dogs, only for them not to quite work out with our lifestyle and Deer’s compatibility.

    So then, we decided to stick with the breed, because Deer has always done better with dogs similar to herself – for example, a husky, bouncy and rambunctious would be a total no-no. Since her size (the medium, or Medio) is extremely rare, we went with the smaller version (the Pequeno), which comes with more portability and some easier management on my part. We drove many hours over many US states, contacted many breeders (well, the few that are available for this breed) to first MEET many prospects, and then to TEST them out for a few hours with Deer, even overnight in a hotel room. In the end, we drove home with Jasper, who is a actually a AKC/UKC championed dog, but with many fears and issues that would make him hard to adopt out from a shelter if he ended up in one (and his breeder, being very responsible, would happily reclaim him at any time for any issue, instead of allowing him to end up in a shelter). Most importantly, the two dogs get along very well, and Jasper has bonded with me, so we will be able to work with his “issues.”

    In response to the article, and all the comments I have read – I would like to advocate for dogs as a whole, and that they ALL NEED GOOD HOMES. I think at the backbone of good dog ownership is knowing what kind of dog suits your lifestyle, what you can offer in terms of time/money/care, and what your “needs” or expectations for the dog. Research is important for any dog you attain – and even if you research a breed to the bone, a dog is still an individual and will exhibit their own personalities, looks, and behaviours. The true benefit of getting a dog from a breeder is lessening the chances that surprises will emerge, and therefore, decreasing the chance the dog is “given up on” and turned into a shelter.

    Shelters are also not all perfect. Many, overrun with the number of animals that need homes, don’t take the time to care and learn about or even rehabilitate the pets they adopt out. Some dogs behave very differently locked up in a shelter, than they do in somebody’s home. Some shelters adopt out any animal they can, without careful evaluation of the home its going to, further perpetuating the cycle of returned and abandoned dogs. And other shelters with a seemingly positive “no kill” policy don’t realize that some dogs are just not adoptable, or require a very rare patient and experienced dog owner.

    Yes, there are millions of dogs in the shelter that need homes, but shaming those who actually do research and carefully select a dog and keep them for their entire lives are NOT the ones to be blamed. Nipping the bud at the source of the problem is where progress will be made. Tighten up shelter adoptions, enforce proper breeding (and possibly prosecuting those who don’t), and educate people on what dog ownership is really like – these are things we can be doing to decrease the number of shelter dogs.

    Reply
    1. Melissa Smith
      June 6, 2016

      Great perspective Angie, thank you so much for sharing!

      Reply
  47. mamanas01
    June 12, 2016

    I am either clueless or people just don’t want to take the chance of confronting me about my personal choices. Our family has a Rottweiler and a Maltese from exceptional breeders. I could only dream if humans could be breed with as equal consideration. These dogs are incredible and it took me years to find the breeder that I felt had the highest quality dog. I am a dog lover and made the best choice for my family. I am glad that I had the option.

    Reply
  48. Jen jen
    July 11, 2016

    First of all, your link is broken, secondly, your argument, with regards to that article ( which I found elsewhere ) is flawed. They discuss 24 ( not 42 ) disorders that they chose to study. Of those disorders, more than half were found to be equally prevalent in both mixed as well as purebred dogs. What is interesting is that there are articles citing this same study that believe it to prove that mixed breed dogs are NOT healthier. It does point out that the purebred dogs who were in the study are likely a result of a backyard breeder, and not one who is reputable ad carefully studies his or her dogs with a focus on health. Just my 2c

    Reply
    1. Matt
      July 11, 2016

      No its much simpler than that. When you buy, and adoptable dog is put to death. Pretty simple to me. Sorry my link was broken i cant really keep updating links on random comment posts. Also sorry i got bogged down in the other part of the convo, regarding health of dogs, which i stand by anyway, but even assuming all health issues are equal, the decision to buy a dog still means one who is hoping to be rescued won’t be.

      Reply
      1. Jen jen
        July 11, 2016

        No, yet simpler…
        When I buy a dog from a reputable breeder, I dedicate myself to care for and promise to provide a forever home for my pet. That action has no bearing on the shelter animals from careless pet purchasers, including those 20% of pets in shelters that are from a shelter…its a cycle.

        Reply
        1. Matt
          July 12, 2016

          so dogs in shelters are from careless owners (classy comment, pretty classist too) and they deserve to die because you’ve done good research and will take good care of your designer puppy…well done humanity. a dog will die when you buy one. that is a fact, you want a dog, rescue one that is going to be murdered. oh yeah but you did research and other peoples careless mistakes (lol) aren’t yours to deal with. gotcha.

          Reply
          1. Jen jen
            July 12, 2016

            glad you are so dedicated to helping shelter animals as am I. Reputable breeders will always exist, which is a good thing. Perhaps we can find a way to educate people who have no idea what that means.

            Reply
            1. Matt
              July 12, 2016

              somewhat sorry for the vitriol-I’m just shocked that so many people don’t see the lunacy (in most cases) of buying dogs while ones next to them are being put down. its so cruel. so yes definitely more ethical versus less ethical breeders always, but why on earth, outside of breed maintenance, are so many making living from growing and selling dogs. it seems insane to me. adopt a dog, save a life-that simple. but i appreciate your tone and sentiment, ALSO looks like petful author deleted her previous comment-jumping right out of this convo lol….and yes there are examples (the woman with the husky search) that feel strongly about having a certain dog, and i feel for them and commend her for trying to adopt but honestly, if you cant adopt a husky – DONT ADOPT A HUSKY, there are many great beautiful dogs that you will love the moment you get them home. stop catering to your own selfishness of owning a dog and create a relationship with one.

          2. Justice True
            August 13, 2016

            Classy there, too Matt. My dog is not “designer”. He’s a working breed. And not the kind for the average pet home. It’s NOT a “fact” that a dog will die because I bought him, as I was not ever intending to get a mixed breed, or poorly bred dog. Yes, they come from irresponsible owners. Clueless people. And they are not murdered, they are humanely euthanized. Not all dogs should live.

            Reply
            1. Matt
              August 13, 2016

              and thats pretty much the entire problem “not all dogs should live” … yeah nothing to discuss after that….that was my whole point, y’all think you should decide which dogs live and die based on your preferences and i think thats insane and unbelievably selfish.

            2. Justice True
              August 13, 2016

              No Matt, based on the dog being that they should not have come into the world in the first place. Do you think a pit bull that wants to kill other dogs, and is highly reactive should live over a dog that will fit into any family, and not be a liability, and accident waiting to happen? It has zero to do with “preferences”…

      2. Justice True
        August 13, 2016

        Who is misinformed here? Actually brainwashed. You are BUYING an “adoptable” dog! You should start saying if you “rescue” a cute, puppy, or purebred dog, you are killing a pit bull, or older dog, or disabled dog. That’s the logic. And mixed breeds health? They get the genes of both parents, who have whatever that purebred can have. Derp.

        Reply
        1. Matt
          August 13, 2016

          well hell, not all those dogs should live right? kill em all why not…its sick

          Reply
          1. Justice True
            August 13, 2016

            No, but many times unsuspecting adopters get a problem dog, so much so that they are aggression cases. Not something that your average pet owner is equipped for. If a dog is in such constant anxiety and fear, how is that fair for them to stay the rest of their lives that way? Or if they are wanting to rip someone apart? Sorry, not all dogs can be fixed.

            Reply
            1. Alex
              August 13, 2016

              My friend adopted a pit mix from the shelter. The dog was so anxious and nervous he became aggressive. My friend did everything he could – training, a behaviorist, medication, etc. He ended up putting the dog down because it bit his neighbor. Not all shelter dogs should be adopted out. It can be dangerous and my friends story is the perfect example. He purchased a dog from the local shelter, was told the dog passed all temperament tests, and ended up with a severely anxious, terrified, and aggressive dog who become a danger and liability. It happens all the time.

  49. Matt
    August 5, 2016

    but thats not happening, millions of dogs a year are being out down because humans have great excuses (some valid, most not imho) for not saving something that needs saving. we can discuss how to lessen the shelter population, but as it stands now for every dog that is purchased from a breeder and not a shelter is a dog that will be killed. I’m not sure i care about issues past that. save a dog, be a great human, whats the issue? when you decide not to save dog from a horrible death i think thats cruel….im not sure how better to explain myself. yes bigger issues we can discuss but that is the actual reality of our current world

    Reply
  50. Matt
    August 11, 2016

    People get sick, people die, people have to relocate, and yes MANY times owners are just careless AND cruel, BUT that is all the more reason that not careless not cruel dog owners need to pick up the slack. instead, on this post, tons of people are basically saying its the OWNERS FAULT AND THE ANIMALS SHOULD SUFFER, its essentially not their problem. For whatever reasons (AND the reasons should be dealt with) but we currently have a nation that is murdering dogs by the millions, and there are millions of humans who love dogs that turn their backs on them. that i think is cruel. changing things in the future won’t save the millions of dogs slated for death this year. for owners that are too sick or stupid or lack empathy to take care of their dogs well, a kind compassionate human must stand up in its place. I’m sick of people saying its not their problem because THEY are responsible dog owners, ITS ALL OUR PROBLEM bc dogs are suffering and we can help stop that right now, and often choose not to bc they really really really need that particular breed they love. thats just as cruel to me

    Reply
  51. Alex
    August 12, 2016

    Here we go! It’s amazing to witness how fired up people can get when this subject is the center of a discussion/debate/argument. Here is my story of Eulalie and my wonderful breeder. I grew up with mixed-breed rescue dogs. My family has had pit/lab mixes, pit/chow mixes, and my absolute favorite, Moose, a shar-pei/lab mix. He lived to be 19 years old. I’ve always supported rescues/shelters and continue to support to this day. When I turned 23 and graduated college I decided I wanted my own dog and companion. I went to the local shelters and looked at all the adorable dogs who were up for adoption. I found the one I wanted to take home with me, a beautiful 2 year old pit mix. I went to fill out the paper work and was told…oh, you can’t adopt any of our dogs…you’re 1.) too young, 2.) you don’t have enough experience with dogs (is 23 years not enough???), 3.) you rent, 4.) you don’t have a fenced in backyard, etc. I was heartbroken. So I decided to take my chances with a local rescue. Same outcome. I was not a good candidate for any dog. I was devastated. Fast forward 3 years…I was visiting my mom in Florida and we were going to her friends house for the day. On the drive over, my mom says that her friend has this huge, black dog and she couldn’t remember what breed it was called. I immediately started racking my brain for big, black dog breeds. Newfie? No. Giant Schnauzer? No. And the list could continue. When I got to the door, I was greeted by this ginormous, hairy, black beast. I could not believe my eyes. It was a Black Russian Terrier. I fell in love. I went back home and immediately began researching more into this magnificent breed. I spent a year reading books, surfing websites, talking to breeders, owners, anyone that had experience with this very rare breed. After a year, I found my breeder – 7 hours away. We began communicating and she told me she was expecting a beautiful litter in 6-7 months as long as the breeding took. Both parents have excellent scores listed on the OFFA website, they have CHIC numbers, they have passed temperament testing, and are beautiful dogs, who fit the breed standard to a T. Every dog in Eulalie’s pedigree is a confirmation champion and/or grand champion. My breeder has a small kennel, a few females and males. She not only shows in confirmation, she also performs rally obedience, agility, and a few other sports. These are working dogs. It literally doesn’t get any better when buying a purebred dog! Eulalie was born on March 18. I fell in love. I sent a check to the breeder for my deposit, and the remainder would be paid in cash when I picked my girl up. I couldn’t wait until May 9th came around to drive 7 hours to get her. My breeder sent regular emails with lots of pictures and updates. She sent me a puppy contract that I had to sign stating I wouldn’t breed her, she would be spayed at the listed age, and all of the information that I needed regarding diet, exercise, vaccines, etc. This is a verbal and legal contract that I, as a responsible dog owner, follow. If I can’t care for Eulalie, my breeder will take her back. If she becomes sick from a genetic disease, my breeder will help me. If she dies from a genetic disease, my breeder will help me. This contract between my breeder and myself is very important. This ensures Eulalie will not become one of the many dogs in shelters or bred without my breeder’s permission. I talk to my breeder on a regular basis and update her on how Eulalie is doing. Eulalie is not just a “designer fashion statement.” She is a working dog and my companion. From the time I picked her up at 8 weeks we have trained obedience and socialization. She is 17 months old and 110 pounds – a very, big girl. She is a Canine Good Citizen and training to be a Certified Therapy Dog. Not only have I properly socialized and trained her, Eulalie is also raw fed. Can you imagine raw feeding a dog this size? It’s not cheap! I go above and beyond what most dog owners do for my dog. She is amazing and I honestly couldn’t ask for a better dog and companion. I am planning to buy another Black Russian Terrier from my breeder, this time a male, in two years. I don’t feel guilty for not rescuing like I had originally planned. Rescuing was not for me, and it wasn’t because I didn’t want to rescue or I didn’t like any of the pit/mixed breeds there. It was because I was told that I wasn’t a “good candidate” for any of their dogs. I am not adding to the problem of the thousands of shelter dogs. I am a responsible dog owner. I made an educated, well-thought out decision to purchase a puppy from a responsible, ethical breeder who goes above and beyond for her dogs and puppy buyers. If shelters were so concerned about the welfare of every mixed breed dog who comes through their door, they would not discriminate against anyone who is willing to offer a wonderful home to one of those dogs. Yes, people have made comments to me about how buying a pure bred is wrong. I just hold my head up high and Eulalie and I keep it moving. I don’t have the time to educate every PETA or AR activist who decided to make it their business of or comment on where I purchased my dog from. Rescuing isn’t for everyone, purchasing from a breeder isn’t for everyone. I believe that people should have a choice – adoption or purchasing a purebred from a responsible, ethical breeder who is breeding dogs to the breed standard and for the betterment of the breed.

    Reply
  52. Alex
    August 12, 2016

    Here we go! It’s crazy to see how fired up people can get when it comes to this subject! I have three purebred dogs – a french bulldog, australian shepherd, and a black russian terrier. My french bulldog came from a family who decided to have a litter, my aussie came from a farm, and my black russian terrier came from a responsible, ethical breeder. My BRT comes from top quality parents. Excellent test scores for OFA, CHIC numbers, and every dog in her pedigree is a champion and/or grand champion. You can’t ask for anything better than my BRT when it comes to buying from a breeder. She is perfect in every way for the breed. Her breeder breeds to the breed standard and for the betterment of the breed. Yeah, I paid $3,000 for her. That’s the average price for her breed. However, my french bulldog was $1,500 and my aussie was $250. It’s no one else’s business how I decide to spend my money. I go above and beyond for all three of my dogs. All three were properly socialized and trained from the get-go. My BRT is a Canine Good Citizen and training to become a Certified Therapy Dog. All three are raw fed and have the best lives. Nobody has the right to tell me what will work for my life. I chose these three breeds after doing a tremendous amount of research on the breeds. The biggest reason why there are so many dogs in shelters is because people are not properly educated on the breed they get, how to properly care for a dog, making sure their dog is spayed/neutered as to not add to the overpopulation, etc…My friend works at the local humane society and she said the majority of the dogs are taken in because of owner surrender. Either they’re too big, too much work, too much responsibility, etc. Very few are brought in as strays. That tells me that people who purchase puppies from responsible, ethical breeders are not the real problem in this situation. It’s the people who aren’t properly educated when getting a dog, people who don’t understand how much effort and responsibility a dog is, or how much money owning a dog costs. My dogs are my family, my children. They live and eat better than a majority of the human population.

    Reply
  53. Melissa Smith
    August 13, 2016

    Due to the inability of some members to keep from flaming and trolling one another while discussing this topic, I am closing the thread. I cannot be on hand every minute 24/7 to ensure that proper decorum is followed by adults, therefore I must remove the ability to post new comments. Apologies to those who discussed things in a rational and non-insulting manner.

    Reply
  54. Janie Gregonis Rice
    August 31, 2017

    I’m beginning to be very anti-shelter. I’ve had dogs my entire life (I’m 63) and raised two 16 year old dogs!! One died last year 3 months shy of age 16, the other just died at 16 years, 1 month. They were my whole life! I thought I would give back in their honor by fostering senior or handicapped dogs as I have experience in that. But, apparently I’m not a fit parent for a local shelter! Why? Because when they called my vet the records showed that I had only got one rabies shot in the past two years. They didn’t bother to find out why – my former vet was a holistic vet who did not believe in giving vaccinations every year – he would do a titer blood test to test levels in my dogs blood. I just started going to a new vet two years ago due to a move and the only shot I’ve gotten there was a rabies.

    They sent me an email that was not signed (chicken-s**ts) pointing out the one rabies shot and did not respond to my explanation about the vets and shots. No response at all! Not even to tell me why I didn’t qualify! I have a fenced in yard, doggie door, live in a nice neighborhood, spent the last year taking care of an invalid Pug who could not walk due to a spinal condition, work from home, have all kinds of dog cages, beds, etc. but apparently I’m an unfit dog parent!! I wonder how my dogs lived so long if I am that terrible a caregiver!! And this application was to foster senior dogs, not even to adopt a new one!

    Shelters who profess to want to find homes for dogs are like the Spanish Inquisition anymore. They think they know better than vets! And, after reading some of the contracts, you don’t even own the dog. Some can visit you at any time and if they think you are not taking care of the dog they can take it away from you. You’re not allowed to sell or give the dog away either if it doesn’t work out. You have to give it back to them with no refund. It’s ridiculous. And a shame! I will no longer support any shelters.

    Reply

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